Trump suggests government start its own worldwide television network

President TrumpDonald John TrumpProsecutors investigating Trump inaugural fund, pro-Trump super PAC for possible illegal foreign donations: NY Times George Conway: Why take Trump's word over prosecutors' if he 'lies about virtually everything' Federal judge says lawsuit over Trump travel ban waivers will proceed MORE on Monday suggested the government start its own television network as he voiced frustration with the way CNN in particular has covered his administration.

"Throughout the world, CNN has a powerful voice portraying the United States in an unfair and false way. Something has to be done, including the possibility of the United States starting our own Worldwide Network to show the World the way we really are, GREAT!" Trump wrote on Twitter.

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Voice of America (VOA) has existed since 1942 and receives funding from Congress. The network's broadcasts are streamed in the U.S. and internationally.

Trump's background in television prior to entering politics led to reports during the 2016 presidential campaign that he would start his own television network if he lost to Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSanders, Warren meet ahead of potential 2020 bids Hillicon Valley — Presented by AT&T — New momentum for privacy legislation | YouTube purges spam videos | Apple plans B Austin campus | Iranian hackers targeted Treasury officials | FEC to let lawmakers use campaign funds for cyber Comey’s remarks about Trump dossier are not credible, says former FBI official MORE.

Trump denied to The Washington Post in September of 2016 that he had discussed launching a media network, calling the speculation a "false rumor."

The Financial Times reported in October 2016 that Trump's son-in-law, Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerProtesters host dance party outside Stephen Miller's home Dem lawmaker pledges hearings after CIA briefing on Khashoggi Trump signs order aimed at revitalizing economically distressed communities MORE, had informally spoken with a media executive about setting up a Trump television network, but the conversations did not progress in the final weeks of the campaign.

Since taking office, Trump has continued to rail against coverage of his administration, labeling stories he dislikes "fake news." 

He has in recent months ratcheted up his attacks against the press, labeling some outlets and reporters "enemies of the people."

Trump has had a contentious relationship with CNN in particular since hitting the campaign trail in 2015. Chants of "CNN sucks" are commonplace at the president's campaign rallies.

The White House earlier this month revoked CNN correspondent Jim Acosta's press credentials following a heated press conference with Trump.

CNN and Acosta sued the administration for violating the reporter's First and Fifth Amendment rights, and a federal judge ordered the White House to restore his credentials.

--Updated at 3:40 p.m.