John Kelly’s exit raises concerns about White House future

The departure of White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE is raising concerns about how the White House will face potential legal and political challenges in 2019. 

Kelly, who was thought to bring order to an often chaotic White House, will leave the West Wing as special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election appears to be closing in on President TrumpDonald John TrumpUS reimposes UN sanctions on Iran amid increasing tensions Jeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Trump supporters chant 'Fill that seat' at North Carolina rally MORE.

Trump will also face a divided Congress next year, with Democrats slated to take control of the House in January, giving the party subpoena power.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDemocratic senator calls for 'more flexible' medical supply chain to counter pandemics The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Don't expect a government check anytime soon GOP chairman to release interim report on Biden probe 'in about a week' MORE (D-Conn.) said Sunday on ABC's "This Week" that he's concerned Mueller may be on the "chopping block" after the departure of Kelly.

"I imagine that [Kelly] was one of the people that was attempting to convince the president not to fire Mueller, to not issue pardons as a means of trying to influence the investigation."

"And so I think with his departure, certainly depending on who replaces him, our concerns that Mueller may be on the chopping block are more serious and this legislation becomes more important," he added.

Kelly, a retired four-star general, was viewed as having brought a level of stability to a White House filled with turmoil.

He was also thought to have been able to scale back Trump's decisions, as he imposed a number of restrictions on the president after he took over the reins as chief of staff from Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusLeaked audio shows Trump touted low Black voter turnout in 2016: report Meadows joins White House facing reelection challenges Trump names Mark Meadows as new chief of staff MORE last year. Kelly reportedly limited Trump's access to his personal cell phone and limited impromptu visits to the Oval Office among aides.

Outgoing Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanKenosha will be a good bellwether in 2020 At indoor rally, Pence says election runs through Wisconsin Juan Williams: Breaking down the debates MORE (R-Wis.) in a statement on Saturday called Kelly a "force for order, clarity, and good sense."

“Our country is better for his duty at the White House. During this time he has become a dear friend and trusted partner," Ryan said. "He was a force for order, clarity, and good sense. He is departing what is often a thankless job, but John Kelly has my eternal gratitude.”

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election Florida senators pushing to keep Daylight Savings Time during pandemic Hillicon Valley: DOJ indicts Chinese, Malaysian hackers accused of targeting over 100 organizations | GOP senators raise concerns over Oracle-TikTok deal | QAnon awareness jumps in new poll MORE (R-Fla.) told CNN’s "State of the Union" on Sunday he didn't know yet whether he should be concerned about the order and stability of the White House after Kelly's exit.

“It depends who they put in as a replacement,” he said. "Hopefully it will be someone just as qualified, just as strong. It's good for our country to have someone like that in that post."

Trump announced Kelly's departure on Saturday, calling him a "great guy" and saying he will leave at the end of the year. His replacement is expected to have a more political focus than Kelly ahead of 2020.

Rumors of hot-tempered disputes with other staffers have dogged Kelly's tenure, and he has been criticized over his handling of domestic abuse allegations against former White House staff secretary Rob Porter, among other situations, which means not everyone is unhappy to see Kelly exit.

Rep. Yvette ClarkeYvette Diane ClarkeThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Top tech executives testify in blockbuster antitrust hearing Hillicon Valley: Tech CEOs brace for House grilling | Senate GOP faces backlash over election funds | Twitter limits Trump Jr.'s account The Hill's Coronavirus Report: INOVIO R&D Chief Kate Broderick 'completely confident' world will develop a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine; GOP boxed in on virus negotiations MORE's (D-N.Y.) response on Sunday was "thank u, next." 

She said Kelly "destroyed his reputation" by making false allegations in the past, apparently referring to comments he made last year about Rep. Frederica Wilson (D-Fla.).

"John Kelly destroyed his reputation when he lied on a sitting Member of Congress," she wrote on Twitter. "Trump’s Cabinet of Corruption is cracking. Thank u, next."