Trump attorney general pick a prolific donor to GOP candidates, groups: report

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocratic senator rips Trump's 'let them fight' remarks: 'Enough is enough' Warren warns Facebook may help reelect Trump 'and profit off of it' Trump touts Turkey cease-fire: 'Sometimes you have to let them fight' MORE's new pick for attorney general, William Barr, has been a prolific donor to GOP candidates and groups, donating more than $567,000 in the past 20 years, according to a Washington Post analysis

No other attorneys general have donated to partisan causes at the same level since 1980, when the earliest available online records became available, the Post analysis found.

Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderAmash: Trump incorrect in claiming Congress didn't subpoena Obama officials We can't allow presidents and public opinion to further diminish the work of the press Democrats sue over North Carolina's congressional maps MORE, who served under former President Obama, came the closest, donating $37,000 to Democrats before he took office in 2009, according to the newspaper. Holder was also a campaign bundler for Obama, raising over $50,000.

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Barr previously served as attorney general under former President George H.W. Bush in the early 1990s. Since leaving office in 1993, he and his wife, Christine Barr, have been reliable donors for Republican candidates and groups, according to federal records reviewed by the Post.

Barr contributed to the presidential campaigns of George W. Bush in 2000, John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers toast Greta Van Susteren's new show Meghan McCain: It's 'breaking my heart' Warren is leading Biden in the polls The Hill's 12:30 Report: Video depicting Trump killing media, critics draws backlash MORE in 2008, Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyPelosi, Schumer hit 'flailing' Trump over 'sham ceasefire' deal Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE in 2012 and President Trump in 2016. He donated $2,700 to Trump’s presidential campaign and $55,000 to Republican Jeb Bush's campaign. 

Barr also donated $50,000 total in 2016 for the GOP House and Senate campaign committees, though he did not donate to the Republican National Committee.

"Bill Barr might be the single most qualified nominee for U.S. Attorney General in the history of the country," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement emailed to The Hill on Wednesday. "That’s why he has earned bipartisan praise over decades of service."

"To question his independence because he supported the President in whose cabinet he will serve is insulting and entirely inconsistent with how Attorneys General during the Obama Administration were treated," she added.

A White House official told the Post that it is "absurd for critics to focus on financial support he provided to his party, which is consistent with what attorneys general have done previously." The official also pointed out that Barr made the contributions during his time as a career prosecutor, not as a political appointee.

Barr has recently criticized parts of Mueller's probe and defended Trump's decision to fire James ComeyJames Brien ComeyGOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate Graham on Syria: Trump appears 'hell-bent' on repeating Obama's mistakes in Iraq Trump hits back at Graham over Syria criticism MORE as FBI director.

If confirmed, Barr will replace Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Washington Times after story on her 'high-dollar hairdo' Trump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy MORE, who resigned as attorney general at Trump’s request in early November after months of attacks from the president over his recusal from the Russia investigation. 

Barr and his wife donated $27,600 in 2008 to Rep. Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteUSCIS chief Cuccinelli blames Paul Ryan for immigration inaction Immigrant advocacy groups shouldn't be opposing Trump's raids Top Republican releases full transcript of Bruce Ohr interview MORE (R-Va.), the House Judiciary Committee chairman who has led a probe into the Justice Department’s handling of the Russia investigation, the Post noted. 

The former attorney general has also donated around $33,000 to sitting Republican lawmakers, including Rep. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockGun debate raises stakes in battle for Virginia legislature Progressives face steep odds in ousting incumbent Democrats K Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers MORE (Va.) and Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonLawmakers set to host fundraisers focused on Nats' World Series trip GOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' Zuckerberg defends meetings with conservative politicians, pundits MORE (Ark.).

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Perry to step down as Energy secretary | Future of big-game hunting council up in the air | Dems lose vote against EPA power plant rule Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (R-Maine) last week called for Barr to pledge his independence during his confirmation hearing. 

"That would be one of the issues that I certainly would want to make sure, and that he recognizes that not only that Mr. Mueller has to be allowed to complete his investigation unimpeded but also that prosecutorial decisions that are made by the department need to be independent,” Collins said.

His confirmation hearing has not yet been scheduled.

Updated: 12:03 p.m.