Trump names Mulvaney acting chief of staff

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAmash responds to 'Send her back' chants at Trump rally: 'This is how history's worst episodes begin' McConnell: Trump 'on to something' with attacks on Dem congresswomen Trump blasts 'corrupt' Puerto Rico's leaders amid political crisis MORE on Friday named budget director Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyTrump's new labor chief alarms Democrats, unions The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - Trump attack on progressive Dems draws sharp rebuke Acosta out as Trump Labor secretary MORE as his acting White House chief of staff, capping off a week of frenzied speculation about who would take over the key West Wing role.

Trump said in a pair of Twitter posts that Mulvaney would start at the beginning of next year after outgoing chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE leaves his post.

“Mick has done an outstanding job while in the Administration,” Trump wrote. “I look forward to working with him in this new capacity as we continue to MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!”

The president praised Kelly’s service and called the retired Marine Corps general “a GREAT PATRIOT.”

Mulvaney in a tweet called the appointment a “tremendous honor” and said “it’s going to be a great 2019!”

As his title indicates, Mulvaney, 51, will temporarily serve as chief of staff until Trump can find a permanent replacement. The president did not indicate how long the selection process will take.

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“There’s no time limit. He’s the acting chief of staff, which means he’s the chief of staff. He got picked because the president liked him they get along,” a senior administration official told reporters. 

Asked why Mulvaney was named acting chief of staff instead of simply chief of staff, the official responded “because that’s what the president wants.”

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Friday night that Mulvaney would keep his title as Office of Management and Budget (OMB) director while also serving as acting chief of staff.

Russell Vought, Mulvaney’s deputy at OMB, will take over for Mulvaney in the budget office while he focuses on his chief of staff responsibilities, Sanders said.

“Mick Mulvaney will not resign from the Office Of Management and Budget, but will spend all of his time devoted to his role as the acting Chief Of Staff for the President. Russ Vought will handle day to day operations and run OMB," Sanders said in a statement.

It is the second time the OMB director has taken on a high-profile administration role in an acting capacity. He had led the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) since November 2017 after its previous director, Obama holdover Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayWatchdog agency must pick a side: Consumers or scammers Kraninger's CFPB gives consumers the tools to help themselves House rebukes Mulvaney's efforts to rein in consumer bureau MORE, left the post. The new permanent director was sworn in this week.

Trump spent this week scrambling to choose a successor to Kelly after his first choice, Vice President Pence’s chief of staff Nick Ayers, turned down the job over a disagreement over how long he would serve.

Ayers’s decision came one day after Trump abruptly announced last Saturday that Kelly would be leaving his job after a tumultuous 17-month tenure.

Trump appeared sensitive to rejections from Ayers and other candidates and bristled at the emerging narrative that he was struggling to attract top talent for the job.

“For the record, there were MANY people who wanted to be the White House Chief of Staff. Mick M will do a GREAT job!” he tweeted Friday evening.

Mulvaney’s name surfaced earlier this week as one person who could be considered for the job, but people close to the budget director indicated he was more interested in a Cabinet post.

Trump met with Mulvaney earlier Friday at the White House to discuss the Dec. 21 government funding deadline, according to the official, but emerged with the chief of staff job. Officials cited Mulvaney's experience as a former member of Congress as a key selling point for the president.

“He knows Congress. He knows Capitol Hill,” the official said of Mulvaney, who served three terms in the House as a firebrand Republican from South Carolina.

The official noted that Mulvaney “didn't find out about [the announcement] on Twitter.”

Mulvaney was a key figure in the Tea Party movement when he was elected in 2010 and was a founding member of the House Freedom Caucus. He became known as one of the most fiscally conservative members of Trump’s team, drafting budget requests that called for dramatic cuts to federal government.

The new acting chief faces a tall task of steering the White House through a political minefield marked by intensifying federal investigations into Trump’s associates and the 2016 campaign as well as an emboldened Democratic majority in the House.

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSally Yates: Moral fiber of US being 'shredded by unapologetic racism' Al Green calls for additional security for House members after Trump rally #IStandWithPresTrump trends in response to #IStandWithIlhan MORE’s (D-Calif.) office called Mulvaney’s appointment a sign that Trump is not interested in resolving the government-funding impasse, driven by the president’s demands for border wall funds.

“It sends a clear message that at this critical time the president would choose to elevate the architect of the last Republican government shutdown,” said Pelosi adviser Drew Hammill.

Kelly, and his predecessor Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusTrump's no racist — he's an equal opportunity offender Press: Acosta, latest to walk the plank Author: Paul Ryan saw retirement as an 'escape hatch' from Trump MORE, also struggled to manage the president and navigate the warring factions inside the West Wing.

The president’s selection of Mulvaney came after several other candidates, including Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R), announced publicly they would not take the job.

Christie said Friday he was not interested after meeting privately with Trump the previous day. The White House said Meadows was out after the two discussed it earlier in the week.

Former Trump campaign aide David Bossie also met with the president on Friday about the job.

Other people said to have been considered by the White House included Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinMnuchin says White House, Pelosi have deal on top-line budget numbers The Hill's Morning Report - Trump seizes House impeachment vote to rally GOP Administration pushes back on quick budget deal: 'We have a way to go' MORE, U.S. Trade Representative Robert LighthizerRobert (Bob) Emmet LighthizerChinese, US negotiators fine-tuning details of trade agreement: report The Trump economy keeps roaring ahead Trump says no discussion of extending deadline in Chinese trade talks MORE, Energy Secretary Rick PerryJames (Rick) Richard PerrySenior Trump administration official to leave post next week Overnight Energy: Trump doesn't mention climate change in speech touting environmental policies | Green groups fight EPA's new FOIA rule | Trump emissions rollback hit with legal challenge Trump touts environmental policies, but says nothing of climate change MORE and Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

— Updated 9:18 p.m.