Mulvaney will stay on as White House budget chief

The White House confirmed Friday night that Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyCollins says she's 'likely' to support calling witnesses for impeachment trial Schumer doesn't rule out calling Parnas to testify in impeachment trial Paul predicts no Republicans will vote to convict Trump MORE will stay on as the director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) even after he takes over as President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE's acting chief of staff.

“Mick Mulvaney will not resign from the Office Of Management and Budget, but will spend all of his time devoted to his role as the acting Chief Of Staff for the President. Russ Vought will handle day to day operations and run OMB,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement.

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Trump tapped Mulvaney earlier Friday to replace John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE as chief of staff after the retired Marine Corps general leaves the White House at the end of the month.

The announcement capped off a roller coaster week of searching for a replacement after no front-runner emerged among the available candidates.

Mulvaney called the appointment a “tremendous honor.”

While declaring Mulvaney the acting chief of staff, it is unclear if the president will continue his search or simply leave Mulvaney in the role on a permanent basis.

“There’s no time limit. He’s the acting chief of staff, which means he’s the chief of staff. He got picked because the president liked him, they get along,” a senior administration official told reporters.

Asked why Mulvaney was named acting chief of staff instead of simply chief of staff, the official responded “because that’s what the president wants.”

This is the second role Mulvaney will take on in an acting capacity while leading the White House budget office. He had led the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau since November 2017 after its previous director, Obama holdover Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayHouse chairwoman backs interest rate cap on payday loans Democrats jump into Trump turf war over student loans Supreme Court agrees to hear challenge to consumer agency MORE, left the post. The new permanent director was sworn in this week.