Mulvaney will stay on as White House budget chief

The White House confirmed Friday night that Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyOn The Money: House panel pulls Powell into partisan battles | New York considers hiking taxes on the rich | Treasury: Trump's payroll tax deferral won't hurt Social Security Blockchain trade group names Mick Mulvaney to board Mick Mulvaney to start hedge fund MORE will stay on as the director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) even after he takes over as President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal prosecutor speaks out, says Barr 'has brought shame' on Justice Dept. Former Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick MORE's acting chief of staff.

“Mick Mulvaney will not resign from the Office Of Management and Budget, but will spend all of his time devoted to his role as the acting Chief Of Staff for the President. Russ Vought will handle day to day operations and run OMB,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement.

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Trump tapped Mulvaney earlier Friday to replace John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE as chief of staff after the retired Marine Corps general leaves the White House at the end of the month.

The announcement capped off a roller coaster week of searching for a replacement after no front-runner emerged among the available candidates.

Mulvaney called the appointment a “tremendous honor.”

While declaring Mulvaney the acting chief of staff, it is unclear if the president will continue his search or simply leave Mulvaney in the role on a permanent basis.

“There’s no time limit. He’s the acting chief of staff, which means he’s the chief of staff. He got picked because the president liked him, they get along,” a senior administration official told reporters.

Asked why Mulvaney was named acting chief of staff instead of simply chief of staff, the official responded “because that’s what the president wants.”

This is the second role Mulvaney will take on in an acting capacity while leading the White House budget office. He had led the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau since November 2017 after its previous director, Obama holdover Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayConsumer bureau revokes payday lending restrictions Supreme Court ruling could unleash new legal challenges to consumer bureau Supreme Court rules consumer bureau director can be fired at will MORE, left the post. The new permanent director was sworn in this week.