Trump holds working lunch, digs in on border fight amid shutdown

President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew EPA rule would expand Trump officials' powers to reject FOIA requests Democratic senator introduces bill to ban gun silencers Democrats: Ex-Commerce aide said Ross asked him to examine adding census citizenship question MORE said Saturday that he will have lunch at the White House with a "large group" to discuss border security as Congress attempts to negotiate a funding bill to end a partial government shutdown. 

The White House later released a list of the lunch's attendees, which included Vice President Pence, White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyOn The Money: Sanders unveils plan to wipe .6T in student debt | How Sanders plan plays in rivalry with Warren | Treasury watchdog to probe delay of Harriet Tubman bills | Trump says Fed 'blew it' on rate decision The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump targets Iran with new sanctions Top Democrat accuses White House of obstructing review related to Trump-Putin communications MORE, the president's son-in-law and adviser, Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerTrump puts the cart before the horse in Palestine Negotiators face major obstacles to meeting July border deadline GOP launches 'WinRed' online fundraising site in response to Democrats' small-donor advantage MORE, and fellow aide Shahira Knight. Trump also hosted Republican Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Defense: Officials brief Congress after Iran shoots down drone | Lawmakers fear 'grave situation' | Trump warns Iran | Senate votes to block Saudi arms sales | Bombshell confession at Navy SEAL's murder trial The 7 GOP senators who voted to block all or part of Trump's Saudi arms sale Senate votes to block Trump's Saudi arms sale MORE (Utah), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump puts the cart before the horse in Palestine Negotiators face major obstacles to meeting July border deadline Hillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns MORE (S.C.) and Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyThis week: Congress set for clash on Trump's border request Congress unlikely to reach deal on Trump border bill before break GOP lawmakers want Mulvaney sidelined in budget talks MORE (Ala.), as well as GOP Reps. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsGOP moves to block provision banning use of Defense funds for border wall Darrell Issa eyes return to Congress Oversight Republicans: 'Hundreds' of migrants in caravans have criminal histories MORE (N.C.), Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanOversight Republicans: 'Hundreds' of migrants in caravans have criminal histories Cummings requests interview with Census official over new allegations on citizenship question House Oversight Republicans release parts of Kobach, Trump officials' testimony on census citizenship question MORE (Ohio), Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzTop Trump ally says potential Amash presidential bid could be problematic in Michigan GOP moves to block provision banning use of Defense funds for border wall GOP lawmaker says some Trump officials contradicting Pompeo on Iran and al Qaeda MORE (Fla.) and Andy Biggs (Ariz.), according to the White House.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellEXCLUSIVE: Trump on reparations: 'I don't see it happening' Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Trump issues order to bring transparency to health care prices | Fight over billions in ObamaCare payments heads to Supreme Court Hillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns MORE (R-Ky.) on Saturday suggested it would be up to Senate Democrats and Trump to reach an understanding to reopen the government. 

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Parts of the government shut down at the end of the day on Friday after the House and Senate were unable to come to an agreement on funding. The main source of disagreement was Trump's demand for $5 billion for his proposed wall along the southern border.

The Senate passed a stopgap measure earlier in the week that included $1.6 billion for border security.

The House then passed a measure that contained $5.7 billion for the wall, a bill that was stonewalled in the Senate.

The White House early in the week had signaled it would accept a funding bill to keep the government open that contained less than Trump's desired $5 billion in wall funding, but the president reversed course late in the week amid criticism from his staunchest conservative supporters.

Friday's shutdown, which affects about 25 percent of the federal government, is the third shutdown in the past year.

Trump pushed back on Saturday against criticism related to the shutdown and his decision to pull U.S. troops out of Syria.

He justified the latter decision by arguing that the U.S. has already been engaged in the Middle Eastern country's civil war longer than planned. He further declared the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is "largely defeated," and that other countries "should be able to easily take care of whatever remains."

The president's latest remarks were less forceful than his initial announcement, in which he declared the U.S. had "won" and that the terrorist group was "defeated."

Trump's abrupt announcement on Wednesday that he would begin bringing U.S. forces home from Syria was met with overwhelming criticism from lawmakers in both major parties, including some of his most loyal congressional allies.

The move has also led to a pair of high-profile resignations. Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisNew Defense chief: Our 'priorities remain unchanged' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump targets Iran with new sanctions Trump urged to quickly fill Pentagon post amid Iran tensions MORE reportedly delivered his resignation to Trump after he was unable to change the president's mind on his Syria strategy.

Moments before Trump's Saturday morning tweets, CBS News reported that Brett McGurk, the special envoy for the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, plans to resign sooner than previously planned in light of the president's decision.

— Updated 1:28 p.m.