Trump holds working lunch, digs in on border fight amid shutdown

President TrumpDonald TrumpUN meeting with US, France canceled over scheduling issue Trump sues NYT, Mary Trump over story on tax history McConnell, Shelby offer government funding bill without debt ceiling MORE said Saturday that he will have lunch at the White House with a "large group" to discuss border security as Congress attempts to negotiate a funding bill to end a partial government shutdown. 

The White House later released a list of the lunch's attendees, which included Vice President Pence, White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyHeadhunters having hard time finding jobs for former Trump officials: report Trump holdovers are denying Social Security benefits to the hardest working Americans Mulvaney calls Trump's comments on Capitol riot 'manifestly false' MORE, the president's son-in-law and adviser, Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerHouse panel tees up Trump executive privilege fight in Jan. 6 probe The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - US prepares vaccine booster plan House panel probing Jan. 6 attack seeks Trump records MORE, and fellow aide Shahira Knight. Trump also hosted Republican Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Dems attempt to tie government funding, Ida relief to debt limit Trump lawyer offered six-point plan for Pence to overturn election: book Graham found Trump election fraud arguments suitable for 'third grade': Woodward book MORE (Utah), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamFranken targets senators from both parties in new comedy tour Ohio Republican tests positive for breakthrough COVID-19 case Trump lawyer offered six-point plan for Pence to overturn election: book MORE (S.C.) and Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyMcConnell, Shelby offer government funding bill without debt ceiling Louisiana delegation split over debt hike bill with disaster aid McConnell privately urged GOP senators to oppose debt ceiling hike MORE (Ala.), as well as GOP Reps. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsGraham found Trump election fraud arguments suitable for 'third grade': Woodward book Allies see rising prospect of Trump 2024 White House bid The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - US prepares vaccine booster plan MORE (N.C.), Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanAllies see rising prospect of Trump 2024 White House bid Republican leaders misjudged Jan. 6 committee Watchdog group seeks ethics probe over McCarthy's Jan. 6 comments MORE (Ohio), Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzBipartisan senators to hold hearing on 'toxic conservatorships' amid Britney Spears controversy Eric Trump lawyer in New York attorney general's fraud case quits Republicans keep distance from 'Justice for J6' rally MORE (Fla.) and Andy Biggs (Ariz.), according to the White House.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell, Shelby offer government funding bill without debt ceiling Franken targets senators from both parties in new comedy tour Woodward: Milley was 'setting in motion sensible precautions' with calls to China MORE (R-Ky.) on Saturday suggested it would be up to Senate Democrats and Trump to reach an understanding to reopen the government. 

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Parts of the government shut down at the end of the day on Friday after the House and Senate were unable to come to an agreement on funding. The main source of disagreement was Trump's demand for $5 billion for his proposed wall along the southern border.

The Senate passed a stopgap measure earlier in the week that included $1.6 billion for border security.

The House then passed a measure that contained $5.7 billion for the wall, a bill that was stonewalled in the Senate.

The White House early in the week had signaled it would accept a funding bill to keep the government open that contained less than Trump's desired $5 billion in wall funding, but the president reversed course late in the week amid criticism from his staunchest conservative supporters.

Friday's shutdown, which affects about 25 percent of the federal government, is the third shutdown in the past year.

Trump pushed back on Saturday against criticism related to the shutdown and his decision to pull U.S. troops out of Syria.

He justified the latter decision by arguing that the U.S. has already been engaged in the Middle Eastern country's civil war longer than planned. He further declared the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is "largely defeated," and that other countries "should be able to easily take care of whatever remains."

The president's latest remarks were less forceful than his initial announcement, in which he declared the U.S. had "won" and that the terrorist group was "defeated."

Trump's abrupt announcement on Wednesday that he would begin bringing U.S. forces home from Syria was met with overwhelming criticism from lawmakers in both major parties, including some of his most loyal congressional allies.

The move has also led to a pair of high-profile resignations. Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman Mattis20 years after 9/11, we've logged successes but the fight continues Defense & National Security — The mental scars of Afghanistan House panel advances 8B defense bill MORE reportedly delivered his resignation to Trump after he was unable to change the president's mind on his Syria strategy.

Moments before Trump's Saturday morning tweets, CBS News reported that Brett McGurk, the special envoy for the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, plans to resign sooner than previously planned in light of the president's decision.

— Updated 1:28 p.m.