Trump will stay in DC through the shutdown

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: 'I will not let Iran have nuclear weapons' Rocket attack hits Baghdad's Green Zone amid escalating tensions: reports Buttigieg on Trump tweets: 'I don't care' MORE will remain in Washington, D.C., over the New Year's holiday as the White House attempts to negotiate an end to the partial shutdown of the federal government with Democrats in Congress.

White House acting chief of staff Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyBolton emerges as flashpoint in GOP debate on Iran Acting DHS secretary threatened to quit after clashing with Miller: report On The Money: Treasury rejects Dem subpoena for Trump tax returns | Companies warn trade war about to hit consumers | Congress, White House to launch budget talks next week | Trump gets deal to lift steel tariffs on Mexico, Canada MORE says that the president has canceled his plans for New Year's celebrations in order to continue working with lawmakers in Washington on a deal to reopen the government, which shut down last week after Trump rejected a bipartisan deal to fund the government that did not include money for his desired wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

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"The president's been here, by the way, all weekend, all Christmas," Mulvaney said Friday on "Fox & Friends."

"He's staying in Washington, D.C., over New Year's. He's canceled his plans for Christmas. Now, he's canceled his plans for New Year's," Mulvaney added, saying that Trump was "very heavily engaged on this on a minute-by-minute basis."

The president has blamed Democrats for the shutdown, despite his own comments earlier this month that he would not do so and would instead take credit for a shutdown over the issue of funding for border security measures including a wall on the border.

“I am proud to shut down the government for border security,” Trump had previously said during a televised Oval Office meeting with Democratic leaders. “I will take the mantle. I will shut it down, I’m not going to blame you for it.”

The shutdown entered its seventh day Friday, with roughly 25 percent of the federal government being affected by funding shortages, including entire agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency.

A Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey released Friday indicated that the president's approval rating has dipped 2 points amid the shutdown, indicating that some Americans blame the White House for the gridlock.