Conway preemptively chides 'phony-baloney' polls showing Trump speech didn't boost support for wall

White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwaySpecial counsel investigating DeVos for potential Hatch Act violation: report George and Kellyanne Conway honor Ginsburg Trump carries on with rally, unaware of Ginsburg's death MORE argued Wednesday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Biden campaign ad jabs at Trump's reported 0 income tax payments Ocasio-Cortez: Trump contributed less in taxes 'than waitresses and undocumented immigrants' Third judge orders Postal Service to halt delivery cuts MORE was able to shift the debate with his prime-time speech on border security and preemptively attacked polling that would show otherwise.

"He does feel that way and I agree he did," Conway told Fox News's "America's Newsroom" when asked if the president had made any progress with his Oval Office remarks.

"And I know there will be some phony-baloney polling question constructions … to show that it didn’t move the needle, America’s against the wall, et cetera, so watch the way those polling questions are formed," she added.

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Conway, who was a Republican pollster before working on the Trump campaign and in the administration, went on to criticize Democrats over their "anemic" and "partisan" response to the president's speech.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi preparing for House to decide presidency if neither Trump or Biden win electoral college: report Trump seeks boost from seniors with 0 drug discount coupons GOP senators confident Trump pick to be confirmed by November MORE (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerDemocrats blast Trump after report reveals he avoided income taxes for 10 years: 'Disgusting' Biden refuses to say whether he would support expanding Supreme Court Schumer says Trump tweet shows court pick meant to kill off ObamaCare MORE (D-N.Y.) accused Trump of stoking fear with his comments about immigration and urged him to reopen the government. 

Neither Trump nor Democrats broke any new ground in their comments Tuesday night, with both sides repeating talking points and further entrenching themselves in the debate over the president's proposed southern border wall.

Trump has demanded more than $5 billion for the structure, arguing it is needed to have adequate border security. Democrats have offered $1.3 billion for other border security measures, such as technology and personnel increases, but have given no money for the wall.

The disagreement has been at the center of a partial government shutdown that has lasted 19 days and counting.

Trump will host congressional leaders from both parties at the White House on Wednesday, then will travel to the border on Thursday. He indicated that he will declare a national emergency to direct construction of the wall if he is not able to reach an agreement with Democrats.

Polls have increasingly shown that Americans blame Trump for the partial government shutdown. The president in December said he'd be "proud" to shut down the government over border security.