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Democrats turn down White House invitation for shutdown talks

No Democrats attended a lunch on Tuesday with President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE designed to reach an agreement to end the government shutdown and fund a border wall, as the president’s attempt to force leaders back to the negotiating table fell flat.

Trump invited several moderate House Democrats to the White House in an effort to undermine Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOklahoma man who videotaped himself with his feet on desk in Pelosi's office during Capitol riot released on bond House formally sends impeachment to Senate, putting Trump on trial for Capitol riot With another caravan heading North, a closer look at our asylum law MORE (D-Calif.), who has refused to grant Trump his demand for $5.7 billion in wall funding. But the group turned down the invitation.

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“Today, the president offered both Democrats and Republicans the chance to meet for lunch at the White House. Unfortunately, no Democrats will attend,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement ahead of the meeting.

A group of nine House Republicans were scheduled to meet with the president, but Sanders said “it’s time for the Democrats to come to the table and make a deal.”

Two of the GOP lawmakers, Reps. Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisCapitol Police tribute turns political Calls grow for 9/11-style panel to probe Capitol attack House GOP leader says he has 'concerns' over Cheney's impeachment vote MORE (Ill.) and John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoCalls grow for 9/11-style panel to probe Capitol attack Hillicon Valley: Intelligence agency gathers US smartphone location data without warrants, memo says | Democrats seek answers on impact of Russian hack on DOJ, courts | Airbnb offers Biden administration help with vaccine distribution House lawmakers reintroduce bipartisan bill to weed out foreign disinformation on social media MORE (N.Y.), have voted for Democratic bills to reopen government agencies.

After the meeting ended, Republicans lambasted Democrats for refusing to attend in an attempt to pin blame on them for the shutdown.

“He’s put a deal on the table,” Davis said of Trump while speaking to reporters at the White House. “The sheer fact that no Democrats [were] here to even talk with us shows the lack of willingness to compromise.”

The event was the latest sign that no end remains in sight for the partial shutdown, which on Tuesday entered its record-setting 25th day.

It also signaled that Pelosi has retained her grip over the Democratic caucus in the wall fight, despite the White House’s effort to divide the party.

At least two moderate House Democrats said they explicitly declined the White House invitation.

Reps. Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyLawmakers move to oust extremists from military Democrats seize on GOP donor fallout Lobbying world MORE (D-Fla.) and Lou CorreaJose (Lou) Luis CorreaRep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19 An attack on America that's divided Congress — and a nation FAA: No more warnings for unruly passengers on flights MORE (D-Calif.), two of the co-chairs of the Blue Dog Coalition, confirmed to The Hill they would not attend the 12:30 p.m. lunch meeting.

Murphy said she had a scheduling conflict, but both Blue Dog Democrats said they believe the Senate should take up House-passed funding bills to reopen the government and send them to the president.

“The congressman is declining the invitation,” said Correa spokesman Andrew Scibetta. “Congressman Correa welcomes the opportunity to talk with the president about border security, as soon as the government is reopened.”

In a statement, Murphy said: “I have attended meetings with the president at the White House before, but a scheduling conflict prevented me from accepting this invitation.

“However, I continue to believe the Senate should pass and the president should sign the bills reopening government that the House already passed. As a former national security specialist at the Pentagon, I look forward to having a meaningful, bipartisan discussion about the best way to secure our country.”

The three other Democrats who rejected Trump’s lunch invite were Rep. Charlie CristCharles (Charlie) Joseph CristCapitol Police officer Eugene Goodman escorts Kamala Harris to inauguration Lawmakers introduce bill to award Capitol Police officer Congressional Gold Medal Lawmakers share New Year's messages: 'Cheers to brighter days ahead' MORE, the former Florida governor, Rep. David ScottDavid Albert ScottOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump admin to sell oil leases at Arctic wildlife refuge before Biden takes office |Trump administration approves controversial oil testing method in Gulf of Mexico | Rep. Scott wins House Agriculture Committee gavel Rep. David Scott wins House Agriculture Committee gavel DeLauro wins Steering Committee vote for Appropriations chair MORE (Ga.), and freshman Rep. Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerHillicon Valley: Intelligence agency gathers US smartphone location data without warrants, memo says | Democrats seek answers on impact of Russian hack on DOJ, courts | Airbnb offers Biden administration help with vaccine distribution House lawmakers reintroduce bipartisan bill to weed out foreign disinformation on social media 'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack MORE (Va.), who upset conservative Republican Dave Brat last fall, according to White House sources.

Scott later told The Hill he never received an invitation.

Democratic Rep. Scott PetersScott H. PetersCalifornia was key factor in House GOP's 2020 success Trump's illness sparks new urgency for COVID-19 deal Moderate Democrats push leadership to pull marijuana legislation MORE (Calif.), who was not named by the White House, also said he turned down the invitation. 

A Democratic congressional aide said the meeting appeared to be pulled together “haphazardly at the last minute,” with invitations to members received from the White House beginning in the late afternoon on Monday and continuing until late at night.

A copy of the invitation seen by The Hill provided little information about the subject of the meeting.

Pelosi has been trying to project Democratic unity in the shutdown fight but did not dissuade fellow Democrats from going to the White House.

In a private meeting Monday night, Pelosi and Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerBudowsky: Democracy won, Trump lost, President Biden inaugurated Congressional leaders present Biden, Harris with flags flown during inauguration LIVE INAUGURATION COVERAGE: Biden signs executive orders; press secretary holds first briefing MORE (D-Md.) told fellow leaders they were fine with rank-and-file members meeting with Trump, according to a source in the meeting.

Pelosi joked to Hoyer: “They can see what we’ve been dealing with. And they’ll want to make a citizen’s arrest.”

Democrats believe they have the upper hand in the shutdown fight, with recent polls showing most of the country blames Trump for the impasse.

But the president has refused to back down from his position that billions in wall funding must be part of spending bills to reopen the government.

“This president isn’t taking polls,” Rep. Jodey ArringtonJodey Cook ArringtonK Street navigates virtual inauguration week READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Hillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones MORE (R-Texas) said after the meeting. “This president has the pulse of this country and he understands that the safety and security of the American people is his first job.”

Hoyer on Tuesday suggested Trump's attempt to sidestep Democratic leaders by inviting Blue Dogs to the meeting was an act of desperation on the part of the president.
 
“Is anybody surprised that the president’s trying to get votes wherever he can get votes?" Hoyer said during a press briefing in the Capitol. "We are totally united — totally. You will see that on the floor on these [spending] votes. We want the government open, Mr. President.”
 
Mike Lillis contributed.
 
Updated at 4:33 p.m.