SPONSORED:

Trump met with contractors to discuss building border wall ahead of SOTU: report

Trump met with contractors to discuss building border wall ahead of SOTU: report
© Getty

President TrumpDonald John TrumpMore than 300 military family members endorse Biden Five takeaways from the final Trump-Biden debate Biden: 'I would transition from the oil industry' MORE met with contractors on Monday at the White House to discuss a wall along the southern border, CNN reported.

The president's reported discussions came a day before Tuesday's State of the Union address, where he is likely to address his desire for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Trump has teased the possibility of using the speech to declare a national emergency to direct construction of the wall, though it's unclear whether he will do so.

ADVERTISEMENT

CNN reported that Trump met last week with contractors, senior White House adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump creates federal council on global tree planting initiative | Green group pushes for answers on delayed climate report | Carbon dioxide emissions may not surpass 2019 levels until 2027: analysis Trump creates federal government council on global tree planting initiative Kardashian West uses star power to pressure US on Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict MORE and White House counsel Pat Cipollone to talk about the wall.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but declined to comment to CNN for its report.

The president triggered a recent 35-day government shutdown over his demand for $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall. Democrats have offered funding for other border security measures, but nothing for the wall.

Trump agreed to open the government until Feb. 15 while lawmakers negotiate a border security funding package, but has threatened to shutter the government again or declare an emergency to secure wall funding if the deal is not to his liking.

A number of Republicans have indicated they'd prefer Trump not declare an emergency, noting it would likely draw swift legal challenges and could set a dangerous precedent.