Trump touts deal as providing $23B for border security

President TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos on AG's new powers: 'Trump is now on the offense' Pelosi uses Trump to her advantage Mike Pence delivers West Point commencement address MORE on Tuesday appeared to express openness to a border security deal reached by a bipartisan group of lawmakers, suggesting that its funds could be combined with others to build his desired wall along the southern border.

"Looking over all aspects knowing that this will be hooked up with lots of money from other sources," Trump tweeted. "Will be getting almost $23 BILLION for Border Security. Regardless of Wall money, it is being built as we speak!"

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Trump's latest comments on the arrangement came after he and Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyOn The Money: Conservative blocks disaster relief bill | Trade high on agenda as Trump heads to Japan | Boeing reportedly faces SEC probe over 737 Max | Study finds CEO pay rising twice as fast as worker pay Conservative blocks House passage of disaster relief bill The Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan MORE (R-Ala.), the chairman of the Appropriations Committee, reviewed the particulars of the deal.

The proposal would provide $1.375 billion in funding for roughly 55 miles of new barriers along the southern border, well short of the $5.7 billion Trump demanded late last year when he triggered a partial government shutdown that lasted 35 days.

Shelby told reporters that he explained to the president that the agreement contained nearly $23 billion in total funding. The senator added that he did not ask Trump if he would sign the bill, calling the question "premature."

"The president's tone and conversation was very good. Concerned that he didn't get everything he wanted, and I told him I shared that. We all do. But realizing after I talked with him … that he's getting a good downpayment," Shelby told reporters about Trump's reaction to the agreement.
 
Shelby added that he told Trump that Republicans "had a good reception in the caucus today about this and we know it's multiyear, we know it's going to cost a lot of money but it's a good start."

A number of conservatives initially panned the deal, arguing it failed to properly address border security funding. Republicans have urged the president to back the agreement, and some of his more conservative allies, including Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsFive takeaways from Barr's new powers in 'spying' probe Trump declassification move unnerves Democrats Conservative blocks House passage of disaster relief bill MORE (R-N.C.), have suggested they expect him to sign the legislation to avert another government shutdown.

Funding for a number of government agencies expires on Friday.

Trump's tweet on Tuesday evening suggests the president is softening his stance toward the congressional proposal.

At a Cabinet meeting hours earlier, Trump voiced disappointment with the deal, telling reporters that he was "not happy about it."

“I’m adding things to it, and when you add whatever I have to add, it’s all going to happen where we’re going to build a beautiful, big, strong wall,” the president added.

A night earlier in El Paso, Texas, Trump told supporters that his administration would build the wall regardless of whether Congress ultimately approves funding for the structure.

The president has floated declaring a national emergency, which would likely draw legal challenges, and acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyTrump arrives in Japan to kick off 4-day state visit On The Money: Judge rules banks can give Trump records to House | Mnuchin pegs debt ceiling deadline as 'late summer' | Democrats see momentum in Trump tax return fight | House rebukes Trump changes to consumer agency House rebukes Mulvaney's efforts to rein in consumer bureau MORE has suggested the administration could reallocate funding designated for other areas.