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Bill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake'

Conservative pundit and frequent Trump critic Bill Kristol on Thursday resurfaced a 2014 video of Vice President Pence saying it would be a “profound mistake” for former President Obama to override Congress with an executive order on immigration.

“I think it would be a profound mistake for the president of the United States to overturn American immigration law with the stroke of a pen,” Pence, then governor of Indiana, said in the clip.

The 2014 video was shared on the eve of President TrumpDonald John TrumpObama slams Trump in Miami: 'Florida Man wouldn't even do this stuff' Trump makes his case in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin Pence's chief of staff tests positive for COVID-19 MORE’s anticipated declaration of a national emergency to bypass Congress and obtain funding for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceOvernight Health Care: Following debate, Biden hammers Trump on coronavirus | Study: Universal mask-wearing could save 130,000 lives | Finger-pointing picks up in COVID-19 relief fight Democrats play defense, GOP goes on attack after Biden oil comments McConnell tees up Barrett nomination, setting up rare weekend session MORE: The president usurping power and end-running Congress is 'a profound mistake,’” Kristol wrote on Twitter.

Pence was speaking at the annual Republican Governors Association conference in New Jersey shortly after Obama announced a major executive action on immigration policy.

Obama’s executive action offered temporary legal status to millions of immigrants without such status, along with indefinite reprieve from deportation. 

Pence criticized the president’s leadership and said Obama should cooperate with the then-new Republican-majority Senate to pass legislation, instead of issuing executive orders.

“Issues of this magnitude should always be resolved with the consent of the governed,” Pence said. “Signing an executive order, giving a speech, barnstorming around the country defending that executive order is not leadership.”

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“I would implore the president to reconsider this path and to demonstrate the kind of leadership that the American people long to see. And that this administration would sit down with this newly minted Republican Congress and find genuine common ground on border security,” Pence continued. “There’s a series of piece-by-piece reforms that I believe that could be advanced in this Congress that would be in the long-term interest of the American people on this issue.”

The newly Democratic-controlled House voted Thursday night to approve a border security deal that prevents a new government shutdown but falls far short of Trump’s $5.7 billion demand for funding for the wall on the Mexican border. 

Trump is likely to reluctantly sign the legislation and also declare a national emergency as a way of getting more federal money.

Republican leadership in Congress, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyRocky Mountain National Park closed due to expanding Colorado wildfire Trump is out of touch with Republican voters on climate change The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Iran, Russia election bombshell; final Prez debate tonight MORE (Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump expressed doubt to donors GOP can hold Senate: report Senators battle over Supreme Court nominee in rare Saturday session Sunday shows preview: Trump, Biden gear up for final sprint to Election Day MORE (Ky.), have expressed support for the president’s decision to declare a national emergency.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, however, have concerns about it setting a bad precedent.

“Declaring a national emergency would be a lawless act, a gross abuse of the power of the presidency and a desperate attempt to distract from the fact that President Trump broke his core promise to have Mexico pay for his wall,” Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump expressed doubt to donors GOP can hold Senate: report Senators battle over Supreme Court nominee in rare Saturday session Sunday shows preview: Trump, Biden gear up for final sprint to Election Day MORE (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerTrump expressed doubt to donors GOP can hold Senate: report Trump announces opening of relations between Sudan and Israel Five takeaways on Iran, Russia election interference MORE (D-N.Y.) said in a joint statement.

“It is yet another demonstration of President Trump’s naked contempt for the rule of law. This is not an emergency, and the president’s fearmongering doesn’t make it one.”

Rep. Chris StewartChristopher (Chris) Douglas StewartAtlanta Wendy's 911 call the night of Rayshard Brooks's death released Tyler Perry offers to pay for funeral of Rayshard Brooks Current, former NHL players form diversity coalition to fight intolerance in hockey MORE (R-Utah) called the declaration a “mistake.”

"It deeply worries me that a future Democratic President may consider gun violence or climate change a ‘national emergency’ and what actions they may then take," he said.