Ex-Trump aide: Can’t imagine Mueller not giving House a ‘roadmap’ to impeachment

A former Trump campaign adviser said on MSNBC that he believes Special Counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE will give the House of Representatives a "roadmap" for impeaching President TrumpDonald John TrumpNational Archives says it altered Trump signs, other messages in Women's March photo Dems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Democratic lawmaker dismisses GOP lawsuit threat: 'Take your letter and shove it' MORE.

“I can’t imagine that the special counsel is not going to release something that shows a roadmap for the House to investigate a conspiracy,” Sam Nunberg said Thursday.

When host Katy Tur asked if he meant a roadmap for impeachment, Nunberg answered affirmatively. 

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"Correct, for articles of impeachment,” he said.

Nunberg later walked back the statement saying he expected the special counsel's office to give the House "a roadmap to their findings."

"I’m not saying that Mueller is going to say whether or not the president is going to be impeached," he said. "I don’t think he can.”

Nunberg also said the special counsel is likely to submit the report soon because Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinJournalist alleging Obama administration spied on her seeks to reopen case Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' Rod Rosenstein joins law and lobbying firm MORE is on his way out of the Justice Department. 

Rosenstein appointed Mueller in 2017 to investigate whether Russia interferred with the 2016 presidential election, including whether Russia colluded with the Trump campaign.

Trump has lashed out at Mueller, Rosenstein and the Justice Department many times. He frequently calls the investigation a "witch hunt."

Former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsICE subpoenas Denver law enforcement: report Bottom Line DOJ inquiry tied to Clinton, touted by Trump winds down with no tangible results: report MORE stepped down in November, saying in his resignation letter that the president asked him to do so. He was replaced with newly confirmed Attorney General William Barr earlier this month. 

Rosenstein has alluded to the fact that he too could leave the department and Trump said he would nominate Deputy Transportation Secretary Jeffrey Rosen to replace him.