Ex-Trump aide: Can’t imagine Mueller not giving House a ‘roadmap’ to impeachment

A former Trump campaign adviser said on MSNBC that he believes Special Counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerHouse progressive: Pelosi 'has it right' on impeachment Democrats talk subpoena for Mueller Democratic Rep. Ro Khanna: 'I'm not there yet' on impeachment MORE will give the House of Representatives a "roadmap" for impeaching President TrumpDonald John TrumpFeinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign MORE.

“I can’t imagine that the special counsel is not going to release something that shows a roadmap for the House to investigate a conspiracy,” Sam Nunberg said Thursday.

When host Katy Tur asked if he meant a roadmap for impeachment, Nunberg answered affirmatively. 

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"Correct, for articles of impeachment,” he said.

Nunberg later walked back the statement saying he expected the special counsel's office to give the House "a roadmap to their findings."

"I’m not saying that Mueller is going to say whether or not the president is going to be impeached," he said. "I don’t think he can.”

Nunberg also said the special counsel is likely to submit the report soon because Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinJake Tapper fact-checks poster Trump admin created describing Mueller investigation Jeffrey Rosen officially sworn in as deputy attorney general Democrats talk subpoena for Mueller MORE is on his way out of the Justice Department. 

Rosenstein appointed Mueller in 2017 to investigate whether Russia interferred with the 2016 presidential election, including whether Russia colluded with the Trump campaign.

Trump has lashed out at Mueller, Rosenstein and the Justice Department many times. He frequently calls the investigation a "witch hunt."

Former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsJeffrey Rosen officially sworn in as deputy attorney general House Democrats leave empty chair for McGahn at hearing MSNBC host: Barr 'the most dangerous person' who works for Trump MORE stepped down in November, saying in his resignation letter that the president asked him to do so. He was replaced with newly confirmed Attorney General William Barr earlier this month. 

Rosenstein has alluded to the fact that he too could leave the department and Trump said he would nominate Deputy Transportation Secretary Jeffrey Rosen to replace him.