Trump claims Democrats ‘don’t mind executing babies after birth’ after blocked abortion bill

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' Trump confirms 2018 US cyberattack on Russian troll farm Trump tweets his support for Goya Foods amid boycott MORE on Monday ramped up his attacks against Democratic senators over abortion after the Senate failed to advance an anti-abortion measure on Monday.

"Senate Democrats just voted against legislation to prevent the killing of newborn infant children," Trump claimed on Twitter on Monday. "The Democrat position on abortion is now so extreme that they don’t mind executing babies AFTER birth."

Trump continued in a separate tweet that "this will be remembered as one of the most shocking votes in the history of Congress."

"If there is one thing we should all agree on, it’s protecting the lives of innocent babies," he said. 

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Senate Democrats on Monday blocked a measure to penalize doctors who fail to "exercise the proper degree of care in the case of a child who survives an abortion or attempted abortion."

The bill, which was sponsored by Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseKoch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads Chamber of Commerce endorses Cornyn for reelection Trump administration narrows suspects in Russia bounties leak investigation: report MORE (R-Neb.), was introduced with the intention of responding to a controversy in Virginia over late-term abortion.  

Senators voted 53-44 to advance the measure, seven votes short of the necessary votes. Three Democratic senators, including Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinKoch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads George Floyd and the upcoming Texas Democratic Senate runoff Energy companies cancel Atlantic Coast Pipeline MORE (W.Va.), Doug Jones (Ala.) and Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: DC's Bowser says protesters and nation were 'assaulted' in front of Lafayette Square last month; Brazil's Bolsonaro, noted virus skeptic, tests positive for COVID-19 Biden hires top aides for Pennsylvania The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Cure Violence Global founder Gary Slutkin says violence and epidemics follow same patterns; Global death toll surpasses half a million MORE Jr. (Pa.) voted to have the measure proceed. 

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineFinger-pointing, gridlock spark frustration in Senate Russian bounties revive Trump-GOP foreign policy divide Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police MORE (D-Va.) said in a statement after the vote that he opposed the measure because of the Republican Party's "misleading" statements. 

"Congress reaffirmed that fact with its passage of the bipartisan Born-Alive Infants Protection Act in 2002. I support that law, which is still in effect. There is no need for additional federal legislation on this topic," Kaine said. 

Issues surrounding late-term abortion gained widespread attention in January after a Democratic-backed bill in Virginia's state legislature proposed to loosen restrictions on late-term abortions in cases where the mother's health is threatened.

Gov. Ralph Northam (D) also sparked backlash from lawmakers and anti-abortion groups over the comments he made about third-trimester abortions. 

"In this particular example, if a mother is in labor, I can tell you exactly what would happen: the infant would be delivered; the infant would be kept comfortable; the infant would be resuscitated if that's what the mother and the family desired. And then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother," Northam said. 

The governor has contended that his comments were taken out of context.