Ethics watchdogs sound alarm over Trump tweet on Scotland golf course

An ethics watchdog raised alarms after President TrumpDonald John TrumpForget the spin: Five unrefuted Mueller Report revelations Lara Trump: Merkel admitting migrants 'one of the worst things that ever happened to Germany' Financial satisfaction hits record high: survey MORE tweeted on Saturday about his golf course in Scotland.

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) said that Trump was using his position to promote his business.

"There it is," CREW tweeted. "The president is using an official statement as an ad for his business and making sure everyone knows he ties his business to US relationships with foreign countries."

A senior CREW adviser called the president's tweet "shameless, corrupt and repugnant."

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"This is Trump’s most explicit commingling of personal interests and public office to date," wrote Walter ShaubWalter Michael ShaubDefense Dept paid Trump properties 0,000 since start of presidency: report Ex-White House ethics chief compares Ivanka, Kushner security clearances to college admissions scandal Cohen's charges make getting Trump's taxes even more important MORE, who used to head the Office of Government Ethics. 

"This is the tone from the top that leads his appointees to violate ethics rules," he added. "This is shameless, corrupt and repugnant presidential profiteering."

Trump called his property in Scotland "perhaps the greatest golf course anywhere in the world" and said it furthered his relationship with United Kingdom. 

"Very proud of perhaps the greatest golf course anywhere in the world," he tweeted, quote-tweeting a Trump Organization tweet promoting the golf course. "Also, furthers U.K. relationship!"

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment. 

It is illegal to use the presidency for personal profit because of the Emoluments Clause of the U.S. Constitution. 

Later this month, a federal judge will hear an appeal from the president in attempt to block a separate case in which the president is accused of violating the Emoluments Clause by accepting payments through his hotel in Washington.