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Ethics watchdogs sound alarm over Trump tweet on Scotland golf course

An ethics watchdog raised alarms after President TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE tweeted on Saturday about his golf course in Scotland.

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) said that Trump was using his position to promote his business.

"There it is," CREW tweeted. "The president is using an official statement as an ad for his business and making sure everyone knows he ties his business to US relationships with foreign countries."

A senior CREW adviser called the president's tweet "shameless, corrupt and repugnant."

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"This is Trump’s most explicit commingling of personal interests and public office to date," wrote Walter ShaubWalter Michael ShaubTrump breaks with precedent on second night of convention Democratic senators call for ethics review into Ivanka Trump's Goya tweet Chris Cuomo blasts Trump over photo with Goya products: 'In the middle of a pandemic, they're selling beans' MORE, who used to head the Office of Government Ethics. 

"This is the tone from the top that leads his appointees to violate ethics rules," he added. "This is shameless, corrupt and repugnant presidential profiteering."

Trump called his property in Scotland "perhaps the greatest golf course anywhere in the world" and said it furthered his relationship with United Kingdom. 

"Very proud of perhaps the greatest golf course anywhere in the world," he tweeted, quote-tweeting a Trump Organization tweet promoting the golf course. "Also, furthers U.K. relationship!"

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment. 

It is illegal to use the presidency for personal profit because of the Emoluments Clause of the U.S. Constitution. 

Later this month, a federal judge will hear an appeal from the president in attempt to block a separate case in which the president is accused of violating the Emoluments Clause by accepting payments through his hotel in Washington.