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Conway's husband: 'Grounds for impeachment' if Trump directed Cohn to block AT&T-Time Warner merger

George Conway, the husband of White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayPence adviser Marty Obst tests positive for COVID-19 Documents show Trump campaign ignored coronavirus guidelines at Duluth rally: report Two Loeffler staffers test positive for COVID-19 MORE, said Monday that it would "unquestionably be grounds for impeachment" if President TrumpDonald John TrumpFox News president, top anchors advised to quarantine after coronavirus exposure: report Six notable moments from Trump and Biden's '60 Minutes' interviews Biden on attacks on mental fitness: Trump thought '9/11 attack was 7/11 attack' MORE ordered former White House economic adviser Gary CohnGary David CohnGary Cohn: 'I haven't made up my mind' on vote for president in November Kushner says 'Alice in Wonderland' describes Trump presidency: Woodward book Former national economic council director: I agree with 50 percent of House Democrats' HEROES Act MORE to pressure the Department of Justice to block the AT&T-Time Warner merger.

"If proven, such an attempt to use presidential authority to seek retribution for the exercise of First Amendment rights would unquestionably be grounds for impeachment," Conway tweeted.

Conway's remark comes after The New Yorker reported that Trump gave that directive to Cohn in the summer of 2017. 

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Trump is thought to be opposed to the merger because Time Warner owns CNN, a news network Trump regularly derides and refers to as "fake news."

The New Yorker reported that Trump complained during a 2017 Oval Office meeting with then-chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE and Cohn that no action had been taken on Trump's request to have the merger blocked.

“I’ve been telling Cohn to get this lawsuit filed and nothing’s happened! I’ve mentioned it fifty times," Trump reportedly said. "And nothing’s happened. I want to make sure it’s filed. I want that deal blocked!”

The Justice Department ultimately brought a lawsuit that year seeking to block the merger on antitrust grounds, but U.S. District Judge Richard Leon ruled last year that the merger could proceed. Last month, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit upheld that ruling, rejecting the Justice Department's effort to have Leon's ruling reversed.