White House pressures Senate GOP to back Trump's emergency declaration

White House pressures Senate GOP to back Trump's emergency declaration
© Greg Nash

The White House on Wednesday chastised Senate Republicans who are considering joining Democrats to block President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE's emergency declaration to secure funding for a wall along the southern border.

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders pushed Republicans to "do your job" ahead of a looming vote on a resolution that would terminate the president's emergency and set Trump up to issue the first veto of his presidency and blamed lawmakers for failing to invest in border security.

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"If you had done what you were elected to do on the front end then the president wouldn’t have to fix this problem on his own through a national emergency," Sanders said on "Fox & Friends."

"The president has the absolute authority, in fact he has a duty to call a national emergency to fix the crisis that we have going on at our border," she added.

The Senate is scheduled to vote next week on the resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration. A handful of GOP senators have publicly said they will vote for it, ensuring its passage, but it remains to be seen just how many Republicans will side with Democrats.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate ratifies long-stalled tax treaty On The Money: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency | Tech giants on defensive at antitrust hearing | Democrats ask Labor Department to investigate Amazon warehouses The buck stops here: How to restore accountability to the federal regulatory system MORE (R-Ky.), who will vote for the resolution, said he expected at least 10 Republicans could vote to block the emergency.

A number of lawmakers, including Sens. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranEpstein charges show Congress must act to protect children from abuse Bottom Line Senate GOP raises concerns about White House stopgap plan to avoid shutdown MORE (Kan.), Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungRepublicans scramble to contain Trump fallout GOP chairman introduces bill to force 'comprehensive review' of US-Saudi relationship Meet the key Senate player in GOP fight over Saudi Arabia MORE (Ind.), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTrump's no racist; he's an equal opportunity offender Lawmakers introduce bill to block U.S. companies from doing business with Huawei GOP put on the back foot by Trump's race storm MORE (Utah), Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseAcosta on shaky ground as GOP support wavers Some good advice for Democrats to ignore in 2020 Swing-state Democrats see trouble in proposed pay hike MORE (Neb.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGoogle official denies allegations of ties to China The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet Cruz in 2016 said 'something fundamentally wrong' with Christians who back Trump: book MORE (Texas), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate ratifies long-stalled tax treaty On The Money: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency | Tech giants on defensive at antitrust hearing | Democrats ask Labor Department to investigate Amazon warehouses Liberal think tank: GOP paid parental leave proposals are too narrow MORE (Utah) and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonAlarm sounds over census cybersecurity concerns Ex-Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker takes job as president of conservative group, won't seek office soon Democratic Senate hopes hinge on Trump tide MORE (Wis.), have all have expressed constitutional concerns about the emergency declaration.

The measure already passed the House, but neither chamber of Congress is likely to have the two-thirds majority required to override a potential veto.

Sanders on Wednesday portrayed the use of executive authority as a necessary move, citing new data that showed a spike in apprehensions and denials of people attempting to enter the United States in February.

"If that doesn’t define crisis I don’t know what does, and that’s something that we have to address," she said. "Congress should’ve fixed this problem. That president tried multiple times to get Congress to work with him to address the crisis. They failed to do so, and now the president has to do what is absolutely necessary and what is right and that is to declare a national emergency and fix the crisis at the border."