White House pressures Senate GOP to back Trump's emergency declaration

White House pressures Senate GOP to back Trump's emergency declaration
© Greg Nash

The White House on Wednesday chastised Senate Republicans who are considering joining Democrats to block President TrumpDonald John TrumpHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Celebrating 'Hispanic Heritage Month' in the Age of Trump Let's not play Charlie Brown to Iran's Lucy MORE's emergency declaration to secure funding for a wall along the southern border.

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders pushed Republicans to "do your job" ahead of a looming vote on a resolution that would terminate the president's emergency and set Trump up to issue the first veto of his presidency and blamed lawmakers for failing to invest in border security.

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"If you had done what you were elected to do on the front end then the president wouldn’t have to fix this problem on his own through a national emergency," Sanders said on "Fox & Friends."

"The president has the absolute authority, in fact he has a duty to call a national emergency to fix the crisis that we have going on at our border," she added.

The Senate is scheduled to vote next week on the resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration. A handful of GOP senators have publicly said they will vote for it, ensuring its passage, but it remains to be seen just how many Republicans will side with Democrats.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLiz Cheney says world is more stable, 'safer' under Trump Sunday shows preview: Democratic candidates make the rounds after debate Paul calls into Wyoming TV station to talk Cheney feud MORE (R-Ky.), who will vote for the resolution, said he expected at least 10 Republicans could vote to block the emergency.

A number of lawmakers, including Sens. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranPompeo pressed on possible Senate run by Kansas media Jerry Moran: 'I wouldn't be surprised' if Pompeo ran for Senate in Kansas Senators introduce bill aimed at protecting Olympic athletes in response to abuse scandals MORE (Kan.), Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungSenators pressure Trump to help end humanitarian crisis in Kashmir Congress set for chaotic fall sprint Overnight Defense: Senate fails to override Trump veto on Saudi arms sales | Two US troops killed in Afghanistan | Senators tee up nominations, budget deal ahead of recess MORE (Ind.), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt Romney The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Bolton returns to political group after exiting administration 2020 is not a family affair, for a change MORE (Utah), Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseManufacturing group leads coalition to urge Congress to reauthorize Ex-Im Bank The Hill's Morning Report - Trump ousts Bolton; GOP exhales after win in NC Trump endorses Sasse in 2020 race MORE (Neb.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Sunday shows - Guns dominate after Democratic debate Cruz on reported Kavanaugh allegations: There's nobody Democrats don't want to impeach MORE (Texas), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeExclusive: Kushner tells GOP it needs to unify behind immigration plan Manufacturing group leads coalition to urge Congress to reauthorize Ex-Im Bank Overnight Defense: GOP grumbles after Trump delays military projects for wall | House panel hints at subpoena for Afghanistan envoy | Kabul bombing raises doubts about Taliban talks MORE (Utah) and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonDemocratic senator warns O'Rourke AR-15 pledge could haunt party for years Conservatives offer stark warning to Trump, GOP on background checks Hillicon Valley: Google to promote original reporting | Senators demand answers from Amazon on worker treatment | Lawmakers weigh response to ransomware attacks MORE (Wis.), have all have expressed constitutional concerns about the emergency declaration.

The measure already passed the House, but neither chamber of Congress is likely to have the two-thirds majority required to override a potential veto.

Sanders on Wednesday portrayed the use of executive authority as a necessary move, citing new data that showed a spike in apprehensions and denials of people attempting to enter the United States in February.

"If that doesn’t define crisis I don’t know what does, and that’s something that we have to address," she said. "Congress should’ve fixed this problem. That president tried multiple times to get Congress to work with him to address the crisis. They failed to do so, and now the president has to do what is absolutely necessary and what is right and that is to declare a national emergency and fix the crisis at the border."