White House pressures Senate GOP to back Trump's emergency declaration

White House pressures Senate GOP to back Trump's emergency declaration
© Greg Nash

The White House on Wednesday chastised Senate Republicans who are considering joining Democrats to block President TrumpDonald John TrumpFeinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign MORE's emergency declaration to secure funding for a wall along the southern border.

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders pushed Republicans to "do your job" ahead of a looming vote on a resolution that would terminate the president's emergency and set Trump up to issue the first veto of his presidency and blamed lawmakers for failing to invest in border security.

ADVERTISEMENT

"If you had done what you were elected to do on the front end then the president wouldn’t have to fix this problem on his own through a national emergency," Sanders said on "Fox & Friends."

"The president has the absolute authority, in fact he has a duty to call a national emergency to fix the crisis that we have going on at our border," she added.

The Senate is scheduled to vote next week on the resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration. A handful of GOP senators have publicly said they will vote for it, ensuring its passage, but it remains to be seen just how many Republicans will side with Democrats.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand Paul splits with Amash on Trump impeachment The Go-Go's rock the stage at annual 'We Write the Songs' DC concert GOP presses Trump to make a deal on spending MORE (R-Ky.), who will vote for the resolution, said he expected at least 10 Republicans could vote to block the emergency.

A number of lawmakers, including Sens. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranOn The Money: Judge upholds House subpoena for Trump financial records | Trump vows to appeal ruling by 'Obama-appointed judge' | Canada, Mexico lift retaliatory tariffs on US | IRS audit rate falls GOP senator calls for resolution of trade dispute: 'Farmers and ranchers are hurting' Frustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran MORE (Kan.), Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungBipartisan senators unveil measure to end surprise medical bills Pence, McConnell eulogize Sen. Richard Lugar On The Money: GOP angst grows over Trump's trade war | Trump promises help for 'Patriot Farmers' | Markets rebound | CBO founding director Alice Rivlin dies | Senate to vote on disaster aid bill next week MORE (Ind.), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyIraq War looms over Trump battle with Iran Alabama state senator introduces bill to repeal state's abortion ban Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — McConnell, Kaine offer bill to raise tobacco buying age to 21 | Measles outbreak spreads to 24 states | Pro-ObamaCare group launches ad blitz to protect Dems MORE (Utah), Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseThe Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget Senate Republicans running away from Alabama abortion law Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order to protect US networks from Chinese tech | Huawei downplays order | Trump declines to join effort against online extremism | Facebook restricts livestreaming | FCC proposes new tool against robocalls MORE (Neb.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzJim Carrey fires back at 'Joe McCarthy wanna-be' Cruz Hillicon Valley: Google delays cutting off Huawei | GOP senators split over breaking up big tech | Report finds DNC lagging behind RNC on cybersecurity GOP senators split over antitrust remedies for big tech MORE (Texas), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeHillicon Valley: Google delays cutting off Huawei | GOP senators split over breaking up big tech | Report finds DNC lagging behind RNC on cybersecurity GOP senators split over antitrust remedies for big tech Fix the climate with smaller families MORE (Utah) and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonBarr throws curveball into Senate GOP 'spying' probe Bipartisan group of senators introduce legislation designed to strengthen cybersecurity of voting systems Trump Jr. subpoena spotlights GOP split over Russia probes MORE (Wis.), have all have expressed constitutional concerns about the emergency declaration.

The measure already passed the House, but neither chamber of Congress is likely to have the two-thirds majority required to override a potential veto.

Sanders on Wednesday portrayed the use of executive authority as a necessary move, citing new data that showed a spike in apprehensions and denials of people attempting to enter the United States in February.

"If that doesn’t define crisis I don’t know what does, and that’s something that we have to address," she said. "Congress should’ve fixed this problem. That president tried multiple times to get Congress to work with him to address the crisis. They failed to do so, and now the president has to do what is absolutely necessary and what is right and that is to declare a national emergency and fix the crisis at the border."