White House pressures Senate GOP to back Trump's emergency declaration

White House pressures Senate GOP to back Trump's emergency declaration
© Greg Nash

The White House on Wednesday chastised Senate Republicans who are considering joining Democrats to block President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem lawmaker says Electoral College was 'conceived' as way to perpetuate slavery Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals to visit White House on Monday Transportation Dept requests formal audit of Boeing 737 Max certification MORE's emergency declaration to secure funding for a wall along the southern border.

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders pushed Republicans to "do your job" ahead of a looming vote on a resolution that would terminate the president's emergency and set Trump up to issue the first veto of his presidency and blamed lawmakers for failing to invest in border security.

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"If you had done what you were elected to do on the front end then the president wouldn’t have to fix this problem on his own through a national emergency," Sanders said on "Fox & Friends."

"The president has the absolute authority, in fact he has a duty to call a national emergency to fix the crisis that we have going on at our border," she added.

The Senate is scheduled to vote next week on the resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration. A handful of GOP senators have publicly said they will vote for it, ensuring its passage, but it remains to be seen just how many Republicans will side with Democrats.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrio of NFL players intern on Capitol Hill as part of league program Trump keeps tight grip on GOP GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers MORE (R-Ky.), who will vote for the resolution, said he expected at least 10 Republicans could vote to block the emergency.

A number of lawmakers, including Sens. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Senate rejects border emergency in rebuke to Trump | Acting Pentagon chief grilled on wall funding | Warren confronts chief over war fund budget 12 Republican senators defy Trump on emergency declaration  MORE (Kan.), Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungOvernight Defense: Senate breaks with Trump on Yemen war | Shanahan hit with ethics complaint over Boeing ties | Pentagon rolls out order to implement transgender ban | Dem chair throws cold water on Space Force budget Senate breaks with Trump on Saudi-led war in Yemen GOP senators introduce bill to rein in president's emergency powers MORE (Ind.), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: Rough road awaits any Trump rival in GOP primary Trump keeps tight grip on GOP The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE (Utah), Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseRepublicans up for reelection fear daylight with Trump 12 Republican senators defy Trump on emergency declaration  Trump faces growing Senate GOP backlash on emergency declaration MORE (Neb.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzO'Rourke: Decisions on late-term abortions 'best left to a woman and her doctor' New report details O'Rourke's prankish past O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College MORE (Texas), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over New Zealand coverage GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE (Utah) and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonScott Walker considering running for Wisconsin governor or Senate: report GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers The Hill's 12:30 Report: O'Rourke jumps into 2020 fray MORE (Wis.), have all have expressed constitutional concerns about the emergency declaration.

The measure already passed the House, but neither chamber of Congress is likely to have the two-thirds majority required to override a potential veto.

Sanders on Wednesday portrayed the use of executive authority as a necessary move, citing new data that showed a spike in apprehensions and denials of people attempting to enter the United States in February.

"If that doesn’t define crisis I don’t know what does, and that’s something that we have to address," she said. "Congress should’ve fixed this problem. That president tried multiple times to get Congress to work with him to address the crisis. They failed to do so, and now the president has to do what is absolutely necessary and what is right and that is to declare a national emergency and fix the crisis at the border."