Pence uses NY Times, Washington Post headlines to defend Trump's claim of border crisis

Pence uses NY Times, Washington Post headlines to defend Trump's claim of border crisis
© Greg Nash

Vice President Pence on Wednesday cited reports from The New York Times and The Washington Post about increased border crossings to defend President TrumpDonald John TrumpBooker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Booker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Trump says Democrats are handing out subpoenas 'like they're cookies' MORE’s national emergency declaration.

Pence highlighted headlines from the Times and Post that read, “Border at ‘Breaking Point’ as More than 76,000 Unauthorized Migrants Cross in a Month” and “Family migration, already at record levels, rocketed to new high in February,” respectively.

The outlets are subjected to frequent derision from Trump, who has slammed them as "The Failing New York Times" and "The Amazon Washington Post," referring to its ownership by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.

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Last month, following a Times report on his efforts to influence the investigations of him and his associates, Trump went so far as to call the paper a "true enemy of the people."

The message comes as Senate Republicans prepare to issue a rare rebuke of Trump and vote for a resolution to block his national emergency declaration.

The White House is currently waging a pressure campaign to prevent Republicans from defecting and joining the 47 Senate Democrats who will likely support the House-passed resolution. 

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate confirms Trump judicial nominee criticized for being hostile to LGBT community Senate confirms Trump judicial nominee criticized for being hostile to LGBT community GOP frets about Trump's poll numbers MORE (Maine), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisGOP frets about Trump's poll numbers GOP frets about Trump's poll numbers Koch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner MORE (N.C.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate to vote Thursday to block Trump's Saudi arms deal Senate to vote Thursday to block Trump's Saudi arms deal Overnight Defense: Shanahan exit shocks Washington | Pentagon left rudderless | Lawmakers want answers on Mideast troop deployment | Senate could vote on Saudi arms deal this week | Pompeo says Trump doesn't want war with Iran MORE (Ky.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiInterior spending bill holds Trump administration accountable for 2017 promises Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data MORE (Alaska) have already expressed their support for the legislation, citing concerns that the emergency declaration violates Congress’s constitutional duty to appropriate federal funds. Their support gives the measure enough votes to pass the upper chamber after clearing the House last week.

Paul has suggested that at least 10 more Republicans back the resolution.

Trump declared the emergency last month after a congressional funding bill failed to meet his demand that $5.7 billion be appropriated for his border wall. The emergency declaration allocates roughly $8 billion for barriers along the Mexican border. 

The White House has repeatedly cited a rise in border apprehensions to further its argument that the nation is facing an immigration crisis at the southern border.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenElection security bills face GOP buzzsaw Election security bills face GOP buzzsaw Five memorable moments from Sarah Sanders at the White House MORE testified in front of the House Homeland Security Committee Wednesday to defend the declaration, saying that further influxes of migrants could "overwhelm" the immigration system.

"Although we may disagree on solutions, I hope there can be a consensus that the current system isn’t working and that this is an emergency," Nielsen said in her opening statement.

Democrats did not appear to buy her argument, however, with committee Chairman Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonDemocrats make U-turn on calling border a 'manufactured crisis' Democrats make U-turn on calling border a 'manufactured crisis' Hillicon Valley: Facebook unveils new cryptocurrency | Waters wants company to halt plans | Democrats look to force votes on election security | Advertisers partner with tech giants on 'digital safety' | House GOP unveils cyber agenda MORE (D-Miss.) saying the wall is just a photo opportunity for the president.

"The president wants to build a wall so there is something to point to, or have his picture taken in front of, to convince the American people he has border security figured out," Thompson said.