Pence uses NY Times, Washington Post headlines to defend Trump's claim of border crisis

Pence uses NY Times, Washington Post headlines to defend Trump's claim of border crisis
© Greg Nash

Vice President Pence on Wednesday cited reports from The New York Times and The Washington Post about increased border crossings to defend President TrumpDonald John TrumpOmar fires back at Trump over rally remarks: 'This is my country' Pelosi: Trump hurrying to fill SCOTUS seat so he can repeal ObamaCare Trump mocks Biden appearance, mask use ahead of first debate MORE’s national emergency declaration.

Pence highlighted headlines from the Times and Post that read, “Border at ‘Breaking Point’ as More than 76,000 Unauthorized Migrants Cross in a Month” and “Family migration, already at record levels, rocketed to new high in February,” respectively.

The outlets are subjected to frequent derision from Trump, who has slammed them as "The Failing New York Times" and "The Amazon Washington Post," referring to its ownership by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.

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Last month, following a Times report on his efforts to influence the investigations of him and his associates, Trump went so far as to call the paper a "true enemy of the people."

The message comes as Senate Republicans prepare to issue a rare rebuke of Trump and vote for a resolution to block his national emergency declaration.

The White House is currently waging a pressure campaign to prevent Republicans from defecting and joining the 47 Senate Democrats who will likely support the House-passed resolution. 

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate GOP aims to confirm Trump court pick by Oct. 29: report The Hill's Campaign Report: GOP set to ask SCOTUS to limit mail-in voting Senate GOP sees early Supreme Court vote as political booster shot MORE (Maine), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisThe Hill's Campaign Report: GOP set to ask SCOTUS to limit mail-in voting OVERNIGHT ENERGY: EPA head questions connection of climate change to natural disasters | Pebble Mine executives eye future expansion in recorded conversations | EPA questions science linking widely used pesticide to brain damage in children Liberal super PAC launches ads targeting vulnerable GOP senators over SCOTUS fight MORE (N.C.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSecond GOP senator to quarantine after exposure to coronavirus GOP senator to quarantine after coronavirus exposure The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by National Industries for the Blind - Trump seeks to flip 'Rage' narrative; Dems block COVID-19 bill MORE (Ky.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenate GOP aims to confirm Trump court pick by Oct. 29: report Senate GOP sees early Supreme Court vote as political booster shot Pence defends Trump's 'obligation' to nominate new Supreme Court justice MORE (Alaska) have already expressed their support for the legislation, citing concerns that the emergency declaration violates Congress’s constitutional duty to appropriate federal funds. Their support gives the measure enough votes to pass the upper chamber after clearing the House last week.

Paul has suggested that at least 10 more Republicans back the resolution.

Trump declared the emergency last month after a congressional funding bill failed to meet his demand that $5.7 billion be appropriated for his border wall. The emergency declaration allocates roughly $8 billion for barriers along the Mexican border. 

The White House has repeatedly cited a rise in border apprehensions to further its argument that the nation is facing an immigration crisis at the southern border.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenDHS IG won't investigate after watchdog said Wolf, Cuccinelli appointments violated law Appeals court sides with Trump over drawdown of immigrant protections Democrats smell blood with new DHS whistleblower complaint MORE testified in front of the House Homeland Security Committee Wednesday to defend the declaration, saying that further influxes of migrants could "overwhelm" the immigration system.

"Although we may disagree on solutions, I hope there can be a consensus that the current system isn’t working and that this is an emergency," Nielsen said in her opening statement.

Democrats did not appear to buy her argument, however, with committee Chairman Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonHouse panel pans ICE detention medical care, oversight Senate to hold nomination hearing for Wolf next week Hillicon Valley: FBI chief says Russia is trying to interfere in election to undermine Biden | Treasury Dept. sanctions Iranian government-backed hackers MORE (D-Miss.) saying the wall is just a photo opportunity for the president.

"The president wants to build a wall so there is something to point to, or have his picture taken in front of, to convince the American people he has border security figured out," Thompson said.