Trump singles out local union boss over GM's decision to shutter Ohio plant

President TrumpDonald John TrumpMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns Trump's doctor issues letter addressing 'speculation' about visit to Walter Reed MORE on Sunday picked a fight with a local union boss over the closure of a General Motors plant in Ohio.

Trump tweeted that United Auto Workers Local 1112 President David Green "ought to get his act together and produce" in the wake of the company's decision to shutter the Lordstown, Ohio, factory.

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Green did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill. General Motors, not the union, announced last year its plans to close the Lordstown plant and three other U.S. factories. The Lordstown operation closed earlier this month.

"G.M. let our Country down, but other much better car companies are coming into the U.S. in droves,"  Trump tweeted. "I want action on Lordstown fast. Stop complaining and get the job done!"

Green wrote to Trump in July to express concerns about recent layoffs at the Lordstown plant and to seek the president's help in getting the company to reinvest in the facility, according to The Youngstown Vindicator.

Sunday marked the second straight day Trump tweeted about General Motors's decision to close the Lordstown plant. He suggested in a tweet on Saturday that a new owner could operate the plant but that "time is of the essence."

General Motors announced plans last November to cut 15,000 jobs and close manufacturing sites in Lordstown as well as Detroit-Hamtramck, Mich., and Oshawa, Ontario. It also announced at the time that it planned to close auto parts factories in Warren, Mich., and White Marsh, Md.

The move drew backlash from lawmakers in both major parties, with Trump criticizing CEO Mary Barra and threatening to end the automaker's federal tax credit for electric vehicles in retaliation.

Trump often credits his administration with a resurgence in manufacturing jobs and a strong economy. His decision to go after a local union boss comes as Democratic candidates running to unseat him in 2020 are pushing their message to workers in the Midwest.

Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeDeval Patrick enters 2020 race O'Rourke says he 'absolutely' plans to stay in politics Krystal Ball: Buttigieg is 'the boomer candidate' MORE is set to visit Ohio this week, while Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandMaloney primary challenger calls on her to return, donate previous campaign donations from Trump Senate confirms controversial circuit court nominee She Should Run launches initiative to expand number of women in political process MORE (D-N.Y.) will be in Michigan.