Trump singles out local union boss over GM's decision to shutter Ohio plant

President TrumpDonald John TrumpMueller report findings could be a 'good day' for Trump, Dem senator says Trump officials heading to China for trade talks next week Showdown looms over Mueller report MORE on Sunday picked a fight with a local union boss over the closure of a General Motors plant in Ohio.

Trump tweeted that United Auto Workers Local 1112 President David Green "ought to get his act together and produce" in the wake of the company's decision to shutter the Lordstown, Ohio, factory.

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Green did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill. General Motors, not the union, announced last year its plans to close the Lordstown plant and three other U.S. factories. The Lordstown operation closed earlier this month.

"G.M. let our Country down, but other much better car companies are coming into the U.S. in droves,"  Trump tweeted. "I want action on Lordstown fast. Stop complaining and get the job done!"

Green wrote to Trump in July to express concerns about recent layoffs at the Lordstown plant and to seek the president's help in getting the company to reinvest in the facility, according to The Youngstown Vindicator.

Sunday marked the second straight day Trump tweeted about General Motors's decision to close the Lordstown plant. He suggested in a tweet on Saturday that a new owner could operate the plant but that "time is of the essence."

General Motors announced plans last November to cut 15,000 jobs and close manufacturing sites in Lordstown as well as Detroit-Hamtramck, Mich., and Oshawa, Ontario. It also announced at the time that it planned to close auto parts factories in Warren, Mich., and White Marsh, Md.

The move drew backlash from lawmakers in both major parties, with Trump criticizing CEO Mary Barra and threatening to end the automaker's federal tax credit for electric vehicles in retaliation.

Trump often credits his administration with a resurgence in manufacturing jobs and a strong economy. His decision to go after a local union boss comes as Democratic candidates running to unseat him in 2020 are pushing their message to workers in the Midwest.

Beto O'RourkeRobert (Beto) Francis O'RourkeHere's what the Dem candidates for president said about the Mueller report Booker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements Harris wants Barr to testify on Mueller report as 2020 Dems call for its release MORE is set to visit Ohio this week, while Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandHere's what the Dem candidates for president said about the Mueller report Booker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements CNN town halls put network at center of Dem primary MORE (D-N.Y.) will be in Michigan.