Trump says he spoke to General Motors CEO over Ohio plant closure

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAmash responds to 'Send her back' chants at Trump rally: 'This is how history's worst episodes begin' McConnell: Trump 'on to something' with attacks on Dem congresswomen Trump blasts 'corrupt' Puerto Rico's leaders amid political crisis MORE said Sunday that he spoke with General Motors CEO Mary Barra over the decision to shutter a manufacturing plant in Ohio. 

"Just spoke to Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors about the Lordstown Ohio plant," Trump tweeted. "I am not happy that it is closed when everything else in our Country is BOOMING. I asked her to sell it or do something quickly. She blamed the UAW Union — I don’t care, I just want it open!"

The tweet was the third time Trump took to Twitter over the weekend to voice his frustrations about General Motors's plans to cut thousands of jobs and close multiple plants in America and Canada. 

"G.M. let our Country down, but other much better car companies are coming into the U.S. in droves,"  Trump tweeted earlier in the day. "I want action on Lordstown fast. Stop complaining and get the job done!"

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In the same tweet, Trump called on United Auto Workers Local 1112 President David Green "to get his act together and produce" in the wake of the company's decision to shutter the factory.

Trump also suggested on Saturday that a new owner could manage the facility but that "time is of the essence."

"Because the economy is so good, General Motors must get their Lordstown, Ohio, plant open, maybe in a different form or with a new owner, FAST!" Trump said. "Toyota is investing 13.5 $Billion in U.S., others likewise. G.M. MUST ACT QUICKLY. Time is of the essence!"

General Motors said in November that it planned to cut 15,000 jobs and close manufacturing plants in Lordstown as well as Detroit-Hamtramck, Mich., and Oshawa, Ontario. It also announced then that it would close auto parts factories in Warren, Mich., and White Marsh, Md.

Trump called the decision "nasty" shortly after the announcement, adding that the company wouldn't be treated well. He also has threatened to end its federal tax credit for electric vehicles because of the planned layoffs. 

General Motors did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.