Trump calls Biden 'low I.Q. individual' after verbal slip

President TrumpDonald John TrumpSanders says he wouldn't 'drop dead' if Trump decided on universal healthcare Overnight Health Care: Trump officials lay groundwork for May reopening | Democrats ramp up talks with Mnuchin on next relief deal | Fauci says death toll could be around 60,000 Hillicon Valley: State officials push for more election funds | Coronavirus surveillance concerns ramp up pressure for privacy bill | Senators warned not to use Zoom | Agencies ask FCC to revoke China Telecom's license MORE on Monday called Joe BidenJoe BidenSteyer endorses Biden for president Sanders 2020 press secretary: Democratic leadership interested in 'corporate status quo' or 'they're planning to replace Joe' Biden joins calls to release racial breakdowns of coronavirus cases, deaths MORE a "low I.Q. individual" after the former vice president had a slip of the tongue and nearly announced he was running for president in 2020.

"Joe Biden got tongue tied over the weekend when he was unable to properly deliver a very simple line about his decision to run for President," Trump tweeted. "Get used to it, another low I.Q. individual!"

Trump has previously deployed the "low I.Q." line of attack against a number of critics, including MSNBC host Mika Brzezinski, Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersOvernight Health Care: White House projects grim death toll from coronavirus | Trump warns of 'painful' weeks ahead | US surpasses China in official virus deaths | CDC says 25 percent of cases never show symptoms Democrats, Trump set to battle over implementing T relief bill Maxine Waters unleashes over Trump COVID-19 response: 'Stop congratulating yourself! You're a failure' MORE (D-Calif.) and actor Robert De Niro.

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The president was seizing on a mishap from Biden over the weekend where he told a gathering of Delaware Democrats that he has "the most progressive record of anybody running for the ... anybody who would run" for the 2020 nomination.

Attendees began applauding as Biden repeated the phrase, "Of anybody who would run."

Biden has long been mulling a presidential campaign for 2020 and is considered a near certainty to jump in the race.

The former vice president has been an ardent critic of the president, and caused a stir last year when he said he would have "beat the hell out of" Trump in high school over his degrading comments about women.

Biden has typically hovered at or near the top of polling among Democrats on their preferred 2020 candidate. 

A poll released earlier this month showed Biden was the top choice among likely Iowa Democratic caucus participants, garnering 27 percent of the vote. Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSteyer endorses Biden for president Sanders says he wouldn't 'drop dead' if Trump decided on universal healthcare Sanders 2020 press secretary: Democratic leadership interested in 'corporate status quo' or 'they're planning to replace Joe' MORE (I-Vt.) was the first choice of 25 percent of those surveyed.

Should Biden officially announce his candidacy, he would join an increasingly crowded field of presidential hopefuls.

Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke slams Texas official who suggested grandparents risk their lives for economy during pandemic Hispanic Caucus campaign arm unveils non-Hispanic endorsements Five Latinas who could be Biden's running mate MORE, the former Texas congressman, entered the race last week, joining Sanders, Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSteyer endorses Biden for president Biden joins calls to release racial breakdowns of coronavirus cases, deaths The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden faces tough task of uniting Democrats MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden joins calls to release racial breakdowns of coronavirus cases, deaths Harris, Ocasio-Cortez among Democrats calling for recurring direct payments in fourth coronavirus bill On The Money: Mnuchin, Schumer in talks to strike short-term relief deal | Small businesses struggling for loans | Treasury IG sends Dems report on handling of Trump tax returns MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: State officials push for more election funds | Coronavirus surveillance concerns ramp up pressure for privacy bill | Senators warned not to use Zoom | Agencies ask FCC to revoke China Telecom's license Senators, bipartisan state officials press Congress for more election funds The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden faces tough task of uniting Democrats MORE (D-Minn.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBiden joins calls to release racial breakdowns of coronavirus cases, deaths Bipartisan lawmakers call for global 'wet markets' ban amid coronavirus crisis Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report MORE, among others.

Trump has previously welcomed the idea of facing off against the former vice president, calling him a "dream opponent." 

Last week, he declined to say whether he viewed Biden or O'Rourke as a stronger challenger, telling reporters "Whoever it is, I'll take him or her on."

Updated at 9:46 a.m.