Pompeo says it's 'possible' God planned Trump to save Jewish people

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoTrump administration imposes sanction on Saudi diplomat over Khashoggi killing Mulvaney: 'Politics can and should influence foreign policy' The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today MORE said Thursday that it is "possible" that President TrumpDonald John TrumpSanders urges impeachment trial 'quickly' in the Senate US sending 20,000 troops to Europe for largest exercises since Cold War Barr criticizes FBI, says it's possible agents acted in 'bad faith' in Trump probe MORE is meant to save the Jewish people.

He made the comments during an interview in Jerusalem with the Christian Broadcasting Network.

"As a Christian I certainly believe that's possible," Pompeo responded when asked whether Trump is a new Esther, who in the Bible convinced the king of Persia not to slaughter the Jewish people. 

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The CBN interview falls on Purim, a Jewish holiday that marks Esther's story.

The CBN hosts in questioning Pompeo referred to Iran as the modern-day threat to the Jewish people. Trump last year withdrew the U.S. from the Iranian nuclear treaty and reimposed sanctions on the country.

"I am confident that the Lord is at work here," Pompeo added, noting that he visited the tunnels under Jerusalem during his visit.

"It was remarkable — so we were down in the tunnels where we could see 3,000 years ago, and 2,000 years ago — if I have the history just right — to see the remarkable history of the faith in this place and the work that our administration's done to make sure that this democracy in the Middle East, that this Jewish state remains."

Trump's support of Israel has been lauded in the country. Last year, he recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital and moved the U.S. Embassy there.

On Thursday, Trump said that the U.S. should recognize Israel's disputed control of the Golan Heights, which was captured from Syria during the 1967 Six-Day War and annexed by Israel in 1981. Israeli politicians had long called for the U.S. to recognize those claims.