Trump formally nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rosenstein at DOJ

President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussia's election interference is a problem for the GOP Pence to pitch trade deal during trip to Michigan: report Iran oil minister: US made 'bad mistake' in ending sanctions waivers MORE on Tuesday officially nominated Transportation official Jeffrey Rosen to serve as deputy attorney general at the Department of Justice upon Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinHeavy lapses in judgment are politicizing the justice system Top Judiciary Republican reviews less-redacted Mueller report Ex-Trump lawyer: Mueller knew Trump had to call investigation a 'witch hunt' for 'political reasons' MORE's departure.

Rosen currently serves as deputy secretary of Transportation, and will require Senate confirmation for his new role. He previously served in the George W. Bush administration and practiced law at the Kirkland & Ellis law firm.

Trump's choice of Rosen was first reported last month, but the president officially sent the nomination to the Senate on Tuesday.

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Rosenstein was previously expected to leave his role in mid-March, but a senior DOJ official told NBC News last week that he would remain on "a little longer."

His exit could be imminent now that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE has wrapped up his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrLove or hate Trump, Mueller report doesn't matter Immigration judge calls Barr's move to deny asylum-seekers bond hearings 'highly problematic' Trump's job approval ticks up 2 points: Gallup MORE issued a four-page summary on Sunday of Mueller's main findings, writing that the special counsel's investigation did not find that there was collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. On the matter of alleged obstruction of justice, Mueller said he had neither exonerated Trump nor concluded that he had committed a crime, according to Barr's summary.

Rosenstein oversaw the special counsel's investigation after former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump poised to roll back transgender health protections Trump claims Mueller didn't speak to those 'closest' to him And the winner of the Robert Mueller Sweepstakes is — Vladimir Putin MORE recused himself, but turned over control of the probe to Barr upon his confirmation earlier this year.

Rosenstein came under scrutiny in recent months following a report that he'd been part of discussions about invoking the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office.

The president seized on the allegations, detailed by former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeThe Mueller report concludes it was not needed Ten post-Mueller questions that could turn the tables on Russia collusion investigators Electronic surveillance isn't spying — it's much more powerful MORE, to suggest the two men looked "like they were planning a very illegal act, and got caught."

The Justice Department issued a statement calling McCabe's account of events "inaccurate and factually incorrect."

McCabe also walked back his remarks, with a spokeswoman issuing a statement that he did not "participate in any extended discussions about the use of the 25th Amendment, nor is he aware of any such discussions."