Trump formally nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rosenstein at DOJ

President TrumpDonald John TrumpEsper sidesteps question on whether he aligns more with Mattis or Trump Warren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' As tensions escalate, US must intensify pressure on Iran and the IAEA MORE on Tuesday officially nominated Transportation official Jeffrey Rosen to serve as deputy attorney general at the Department of Justice upon Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinFeds will not charge officer who killed Eric Garner The Hill's Morning Report — Trump retreats on census citizenship question Judiciary issues blitz of subpoenas for Kushner, Sessions, Trump associates MORE's departure.

Rosen currently serves as deputy secretary of Transportation, and will require Senate confirmation for his new role. He previously served in the George W. Bush administration and practiced law at the Kirkland & Ellis law firm.

Trump's choice of Rosen was first reported last month, but the president officially sent the nomination to the Senate on Tuesday.

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Rosenstein was previously expected to leave his role in mid-March, but a senior DOJ official told NBC News last week that he would remain on "a little longer."

His exit could be imminent now that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE has wrapped up his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet House poised to hold Barr, Ross in contempt Harris campaign accepts money from partners of law firm she criticized over Epstein case MORE issued a four-page summary on Sunday of Mueller's main findings, writing that the special counsel's investigation did not find that there was collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. On the matter of alleged obstruction of justice, Mueller said he had neither exonerated Trump nor concluded that he had committed a crime, according to Barr's summary.

Rosenstein oversaw the special counsel's investigation after former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPress: Acosta, latest to walk the plank The Hill's Morning Report — Trump retreats on census citizenship question Alabama senator says Trump opposed to Sessions Senate bid MORE recused himself, but turned over control of the probe to Barr upon his confirmation earlier this year.

Rosenstein came under scrutiny in recent months following a report that he'd been part of discussions about invoking the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office.

The president seized on the allegations, detailed by former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeMcCabe says it's 'absolutely' time to launch impeachment inquiry into Trump Feds gone wild: DOJ's stunning inability to prosecute its own bad actors Comey: Trump peddling 'dumb lies' MORE, to suggest the two men looked "like they were planning a very illegal act, and got caught."

The Justice Department issued a statement calling McCabe's account of events "inaccurate and factually incorrect."

McCabe also walked back his remarks, with a spokeswoman issuing a statement that he did not "participate in any extended discussions about the use of the 25th Amendment, nor is he aware of any such discussions."