George Conway: Mueller report must have 'something pretty damning' if it can't exonerate Trump

George ConwayGeorge Thomas ConwayGeorge Conway calls out Melania Trump after she criticizes impeachment witness: 'You're amplifying what was a nothingburger reference' George Conway quote-tweets Kellyanne Conway on Trump, Biden, Ukraine George Conway argues impeachment effort doesn't need a 'smoking gun' MORE, a lawyer married to White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayOvernight Health Care: House to vote next week on drug prices bill | Conway says Trump trying to find 'balance' on youth vaping | US spent trillion on hospitals in 2018 White House adopts confident tone after Pelosi signals go on impeachment Conway: Trump trying to find 'balance' on youth vaping issue MORE, argued Tuesday that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE's report must have "something pretty damning in it" if it could not exonerate President TrumpDonald John TrumpLawmakers prep ahead of impeachment hearing Democrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Warren says she made almost M from legal work over past three decades MORE on the question of obstruction of justice.

Conway, a frequent critic of Trump who recently feuded with the president on Twitter, wrote in an op-ed in The Washington Post that it was "stunning" for Mueller to include a line in his report stating that "while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

ADVERTISEMENT

"Mueller didn’t have to say that. Indeed, making that very point, the president’s outside counsel, Rudolph W. Giuliani, called the statement a 'cheap shot,'" Conway wrote. "But Mueller isn’t prone to cheap shots; he plays by the rules, every step of the way. If his report doesn’t exonerate the president, there must be something pretty damning in it about him, even if it might not suffice to prove a crime beyond a reasonable doubt."

Mueller's report has not been released publicly, but Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrFive things to watch in Russia probe review Trump, GOP shift focus from alleged surveillance abuse to Durham Russia probe Trump: Giuliani to deliver report on Ukraine trip to Congress, Barr MORE on Sunday shared a summary of what he described as Mueller’s "principal conclusions," revealing that Mueller did not find evidence to establish that members or associates of the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government to interfere in the 2016 election.

According to Barr, Mueller also "ultimately determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgment" regarding whether Trump attempted to obstruct the probe itself — leaving the decision up to the Justice Department.

Barr wrote that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein, Sessions discussed firing Comey in late 2016 or early 2017: FBI notes Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe Judge rules former WH counsel McGahn must testify under subpoena MORE determined that the evidence was "not sufficient" to establish that Trump obstructed the investigation. 

Conway argued that, based on the Justice Department summary, Mueller wrote his report in such a way that allows "the American people and Congress to decide what to make of the facts."

"Americans should expect far more from a president than merely that he not be provably a criminal," Conway wrote. "They should expect a president to comport himself in accordance with the high duties of his office."

Conway highlighted Trump’s frequent public attacks on Mueller, former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe shifting impeachment positions of Jonathan Turley Rosenstein, Sessions discussed firing Comey in late 2016 or early 2017: FBI notes Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe MORE and other Justice Department officials throughout the nearly two-year investigation.

"If the charge were unfitness for office, the verdict would already be in: guilty beyond a reasonable doubt," Conway concluded.

Conway has emerged as one of the president’s most frequent critics, despite his wife’s high-ranking position in the Trump administration.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump responded to the lawyer earlier this month, sharing a tweet from his campaign manager Brad Parscale accusing Conway of being jealous of his wife and calling him "a total loser!"

The men have continued to trade barbs on Twitter, with Trump calling Conway the "husband from helland a "whack job" and Conway calling Trump "nuts."

Kellyanne Conway has stood by the president, saying her husband is not a medical professional and should not be questioning his mental fitness.