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Kushner working to increase legal immigration: report

White House senior adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerPompeo becomes first top US diplomat to visit Israeli settlement, labels boycotts anti-Semitic NYT's Bruni suggests Ivanka Trump, Kushner move to North Korea or Saudi Arabia With Biden, a Saudi reboot MORE is reportedly working on a plan to increase some forms of legal immigration to the U.S.

Politico, citing four people involved in discussions, reported Wednesday that Kushner is developing a plan that would increase the number of low- and high-skilled workers allowed to enter the country each year.

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Development of the proposal reportedly began in January, when Kushner began meeting with dozens of advocacy groups. Talks have since continued among a four-person group within the White House, led by Kushner, and a proposal could be submitted to Congress by this summer, according to Politico.

The news outlet also noted that President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden team wants to understand Trump effort to 'hollow out government agencies' Trump's remaking of the judicial system Overnight Defense: Trump transgender ban 'inflicts concrete harms,' study says | China objects to US admiral's Taiwan visit MORE personally tasked Kushner with coming up with a plan on legal immigration.

The plan would need to be approved by Stephen Miller, Politico noted, adding that the White House senior adviser is especially hawkish on immigration and has previously worked to reduce legal immigration.

Trump said during his State of the Union address earlier this year that he wanted legal immigration "in the largest numbers ever," Politico added.

News of the policy push comes as Trump has continued to take a hard stance on immigration, threatening in recent days to close off the border entirely.

Trump, citing a crisis at the border, said last week that he would consider shuttering the border. He has continued to make that threat this week, telling reporters on Tuesday in the Oval Office that he would "100 percent" close the border if Congress doesn't pass stricter immigration laws.

However, with Republicans warning that closing the border could have devastating impacts on the economy, Trump appeared to pull back from the threat on Tuesday evening. The president claimed during remarks at the National Republican Congressional Committee's annual spring dinner that Mexico was now cooperating in apprehending migrants before they can reach the U.S. border.