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Kushner's security clearance was denied due to concerns of foreign influence: report

President TrumpDonald TrumpGOP-led Maricopa County board decries election recount a 'sham' Analysis: Arpaio immigration patrol lawsuit to cost Arizona county at least 2 million Conservatives launch 'anti-cancel culture' advocacy organization MORE's son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerCDC's about-face on masks appears politically motivated to help a struggling Biden New Kushner group aims to promote relations between Arab states, Israel Republicans request documents on Kerry's security clearance process MORE, was reportedly denied security clearance last year over concerns of foreign influence and private business interests, The Washington Post reported Wednesday.

The Post, citing people familiar with the situation, identified Kushner as the "Senior White House Official 1" identified in House Oversight Committee documents released this week.

According to the documents, the individual was denied security clearance initially by career officials before being overruled by Carl Kline, who headed the White House’s personnel security office at the time.

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House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsOvernight Health Care: AstraZeneca may have included outdated data on vaccine trial, officials say | Pelosi says drug pricing measure under discussion for infrastructure package | Biden administration extends special ObamaCare enrollment until August Pelosi: Drug pricing measure under discussion for infrastructure package Bottom line MORE (D-Md.) on Monday released a memo detailing allegations from Tricia Newbold, a whistleblower who has worked as a career official in the Executive Office of the President for 18 years.

Newbold told the committee last month that officials in the Trump administration overruled her and others' recommendations not to grant security clearances to 25 individuals.

She also reportedly told the committee that a background investigation into Kushner brought concerns regarding foreign influence, personal conduct and other business interests, according to the Post.

The issues raised by Kushner's background check were not made clear, but the Post reported in 2018 that foreign officials had allegedly discussed ways to influence Kushner by leveraging his business dealings and lack of foreign policy experience.

The United Arab Emirates, China, Israel and Mexico reportedly discussed such efforts, current and former officials told the paper.

The New York Times reported in February that Trump ordered Kushner be given top-secret security clearances despite concerns raised by the intelligence community. Cummings's memo did not mention Kushner or any other specific individuals, but Reuters reported Monday that Kushner and his wife, Ivanka TrumpIvanka TrumpMelinda Gates tapped divorce lawyers in 2019 after Epstein links to husband: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Facebook upholds Trump ban; GOP leaders back Stefanik to replace Cheney Ivanka Trump doubles down on vaccine push with post celebrating second shot MORE, President Trump's daughter, are among the individuals who received clearance despite warnings from experts.

In an interview Monday with Fox News’s Laura Ingraham, Kushner did not address the issue of security clearances directly but said that during his time in the White House he has been "accused of all different types of things" that "turned out to be false." 

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.