Trump on WikiLeaks after Assange arrest: 'It's not my thing'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE on Thursday sought to distance himself from WikiLeaks after founder Julian Assange’s arrest in London, even though he praised the group during the 2016 presidential campaign.

“I know nothing about WikiLeaks. It’s not my thing,” Trump told reporters in the Oval Office when asked if he still loves the organization.

The president said he has “been seeing what’s happened with Assange” but added that what happens next is up to Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrFeds charge five in international ID theft ring targeting military members, veterans The road not taken: Another FBI failure involving the Clintons surfaces Correctional officers subpoenaed in Epstein investigation: report MORE.

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Assange could be extradited from the United Kingdom in order to face a computer hacking charge in the U.S.

Trump repeatedly professed his affinity for WikiLeaks during the 2016 campaign, when it published emails that were stolen from Democrats by Russian hackers as part of Moscow’s effort to hurt Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump takes aim at media after 'hereby' ordering US businesses out of China Trump knocks news of CNN hiring ex-FBI official McCabe Taylor Swift says Trump is 'gaslighting the American public' MORE.

“I love WikiLeaks,” Trump said at an October 2016 rally in Pennsylvania.

“Getting off the plane, they were just announcing new WikiLeaks, and I wanted to stay there, but I didn’t want to keep you waiting,” he said four days before Election Day that year. “Boy, I love reading those WikiLeaks.”

Trump mentioned WikiLeaks 145 times in the final month of the campaign alone, according to NBC News.

A Trump campaign official ordered longtime Trump adviser Roger StoneRoger Jason Stone3 real problems Republicans need to address to win in 2020 Judge rejects Stone's request to dismiss charges Judge dismisses DNC lawsuit against Trump campaign, Russia over election interference MORE to contact WikiLeaks about the hacked Democratic emails, according to federal prosecutors. Stone was charged with lying, obstruction and witness tampering by special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE during his probe into Russia’s election interference in 2016.

Trump's comments came hours after Assange was arrested in the U.K. capital. The WikiLeaks founder had been staying at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London since 2012 before the country’s government withdrew his asylum this week.

Soon after his arrest, the Justice Department unsealed an indictment accusing Assange of conspiring with former U.S. Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to break a password in order to access classified government materials.

The charge was related to the 2010 release of U.S. diplomatic cables and classified information about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, not the 2016 disclosures.