Poll: 39 percent say Mueller failed to prove Trump campaign did not collude with Russia

Almost 4 in 10 Americans think special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerHouse progressive: Pelosi 'has it right' on impeachment Democrats talk subpoena for Mueller Democratic Rep. Ro Khanna: 'I'm not there yet' on impeachment MORE's investigation failed to prove President TrumpDonald John TrumpFeinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign MORE's campaign did not collude with Russia, according to a Fox News poll released a day before a redacted version of the report was slated to be made public.

Thirty-nine percent of survey respondents said they think the Russia probe did not exonerate Trump of collusion, while 35 percent said it did. Twenty-five percent said they did not know whether the report proved collusion.

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Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign Justin Amash confirms collusion witch hunt was all about politics MORE last month sent a four-page letter to Congress that provided his summary of the report's top-level findings, saying there was no evidence that Trump's campaign coordinated with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.

Several Democrats have questioned that summary and called for the report to be released in full.

The Department of Justice is set to release a redacted version of Mueller's investigation report on Thursday.

Mueller, who was appointed in 2017 to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 election, had a positive approval rating in Wednesday's poll: 42 percent had a favorable view of him, while 30 percent did not. 

Forty-four percent of respondents approved of Trump's job performance, while 53 percent expressed negative views about him.

Fox News surveyed 1,005 registered voters from April 14 to 16, split 42 to 42 percent between those who identified as Democrats and Republicans. The margin of error for the full sample was 3 percentage points.