Giuliani: Trump lawyers saw Mueller report Tuesday as they prepared rebuttal

President TrumpDonald John TrumpRepublicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Bombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' Lawmakers dismiss Chinese retaliatory threat to US tech MORE's personal attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiHillicon Valley: Apple, Facebook defend encryption during Senate grilling | Tech legal shield makes it into trade deal | Impeachment controversy over phone records heats up | TikTok chief cancels Capitol Hill meetings Giuliani: Trump asked me to brief Justice Department, GOP lawmakers on Ukraine trip The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today MORE said Thursday that White House lawyers saw special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE's report on Tuesday — two days before its release to the public — as they prepared a rebuttal.

"I read every page. ... We started on Tuesday night," Giuliani said on Fox News shortly after the redacted report was released. "We went to the Justice Department, in a secured room. We couldn't take it out, we couldn't photograph it."

Giuliani said that he and White House lawyers Jay SekulowJay Alan SekulowOn The Money: Stocks tumble on Trump China trade remarks | Trump says deal could come after 2020 | Why Wall Street freaked | Trump loses appeal over Deutsche Bank subpoena Appeals court rules Deutsche Bank must turn over Trump financial records to House Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe MORE, Marty Raskin and Jane Raskin each reviewed the entire redacted report before sharing their thoughts.

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They did not receive their own copy of the report but were allowed to take notes, Giuliani added.

The New York Times reported Wednesday that Trump's legal team had early access to the report and discussed it with Justice Department officials.

Giuliani told the Wall Street Journal that Trump's legal team received “no guidance on our counter-report" from the Justice Department.

Democrats slammed Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrHillicon Valley: Apple, Facebook defend encryption during Senate grilling | Tech legal shield makes it into trade deal | Impeachment controversy over phone records heats up | TikTok chief cancels Capitol Hill meetings Giuliani: Trump asked me to brief Justice Department, GOP lawmakers on Ukraine trip Apple, Facebook defend encryption during Senate grilling MORE and the Justice Department following the New York Times report, saying the White House getting the report early dented the Justice Department's credibility.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerGOP calls for minority hearing on impeachment, threatens procedural measures READ: Articles of impeachment against Trump Trump, White House rip Democrats over impeachment articles MORE (D-N.Y.) said he was "deeply troubled" by the Times report that the White House was briefed on the Mueller report.

"I’m deeply troubled by reports that the WH is being briefed on the Mueller report AHEAD of its release. Now, DOJ is informing us we will not receive the report until around 11/12 tomorrow afternoon — AFTER Barr’s press conference. This is wrong," he tweeted.

"News reports suggesting that the White House was briefed on the #MuellerReport ahead of its release and that the DOJ intends to brief the press before receipt of the report are troubling," Rep. Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeOvernight Defense: Trump leaves door open to possible troop increase in Middle East | Putin offers immediate extension of key nuclear treaty Lawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Lawmakers honor JFK on 56th anniversary of his death MORE (D-Texas) tweeted.

A redacted version of the report was released Thursday on the Justice Department's website, shortly after Barr delivered a summary of the findings and took questions from reporters.