Giuliani: 'Nothing wrong' with campaign taking information from Russians

President TrumpDonald John TrumpProtesters tear down statue of Christopher Columbus in Baltimore 'Independence Day' star Bill Pullman urges Americans to wear a 'freedom mask' in July 4 PSA Protesters burn American flag outside White House after Trump's July Fourth address MORE's lawyer Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiOusted Manhattan US Attorney Berman to testify before House next week Sunday shows preview: With coronavirus cases surging, lawmakers and health officials weigh in Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down MORE said Sunday that there was "nothing wrong" with a campaign accepting help from Russia.

"There’s nothing wrong with taking information from Russians," Giuliani told CNN host Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperCarson calls for local leaders to 'condemn vandalization of statues,' 'dismantle autonomous zones' Officials couldn't reach Trump on golf course to delete retweet of video showing man chanting 'white power': report Democratic officials, governors push for nationwide mask mandate as administration defends state-by-state approach MORE on "State of the Union."

"It depends on where it came from," he added. "You're assuming that the giving of information is a campaign contribution."

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Tapper pushed back on Giuliani's claim, questioning whether Giuliani would accept information from Russians against a candidate if he were running for office.

"I probably wouldn't. I wasn't asked," Giuliani responded. "I would have advised, just out of excess of caution, don't do it." 

"But you're saying there was nothing wrong with doing that," Tapper interjected. 

"There's no crime," Giuliani replied. "We're going to get into morality? That isn't what prosecutors look at — morality." 

Giuliani appeared to make similar comments to NBC's Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddTrump dings CNN, 'Morning Joe' ratings as Tucker Carlson sets record Cuomo: Trump administration 'in denial' about coronavirus 'problem' Arkansas governor urges 'consistent national message' on wearing masks MORE in an interview that aired Sunday.

"So, it is now OK for political campaigns to work with materials stolen by foreign adversaries?” Todd asked the attorney on "Meet the Press."

“Well, it depends on the stolen material,” Giuliani responded.

Giuliani's comments came after the attorney in the same interview criticized GOP Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyQAnon scores wins, creating GOP problem Republicans fear backlash over Trump's threatened veto on Confederate names Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police MORE (Utah) for issuing a statement on Friday saying he was "appalled" by the findings laid out in special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's report on his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian election interference.

"I am also appalled that, among other things, fellow citizens working in a campaign for president welcomed help from Russia — including information that had been illegally obtained; that none of them acted to inform American law enforcement," Romney wrote.

Giuliani told Hill.TV on Thursday that Mueller's 400-plus-page report took a "cheap shot" at the president, calling Mueller's findings "one-sided."

Trump and his associates have levied an onslaught of attacks against Mueller's report in recent days, declaring victory after the report found that there was no coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia.

The special counsel, however, wrote in his report that his team probed 10 “episodes” of potential obstruction of justice, leaving the door open to possible congressional probes of Trump’s conduct.