Kushner saying immigration plan will be 'neutral' on legal admissions: report

Kushner saying immigration plan will be 'neutral' on legal admissions: report
© Stefani Reynolds

White House senior adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerOn The Money: Judge upholds House subpoena for Trump financial records | Trump vows to appeal ruling by 'Obama-appointed judge' | Canada, Mexico lift retaliatory tariffs on US | IRS audit rate falls The Hill's 12:30 Report: Amash under fire after impeachment tweets Ann Coulter: Four myths the media and politicians tell you about our border crisis MORE has reportedly told associates that a plan to reform the U.S. immigration system he is working on will not affect the overall number of legal admissions into the United States.

Axios reported Wednesday that Kushner has told people involved with the effort that his plan will be "neutral" on overall immigration levels, and will seek to reduce the number of immigrants coming in due to family relationships while increasing the number of high-skilled immigrants admitted for work visas.

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Multiple sources told the news outlet that Kushner said the plan will address issues such as visa overstays and seasonal workers, and that he hopes to present the plan to President TrumpDonald John TrumpWhat the Mueller report tells us about Putin, Russia and Trump's election Fox's Brit Hume fires back at Trump's criticism of the channel Anti-US trade war song going viral in China MORE in the form of legislation in the coming days.

Kushner has also enlisted the White House Council of Economic Advisers to study the plan and "make sure the plan has positive effects on GDP [gross domestic product] growth and wage growth," according to one person familiar with the efforts.

Some Republican senators including Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeFix the climate with smaller families Bolton emerges as flashpoint in GOP debate on Iran Frustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran MORE (Utah), John CornynJohn CornynTrump's immigration push faces Capitol Hill buzzsaw The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate Sinema, Gallagher fastest lawmakers in charity race MORE (Texas) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTensions swirl around Iran as administration to brief Congress Press: Justin Amash breaks ranks with party Overnight Defense: Iran tensions swirl as officials prepare to brief Congress | Trump threatens war would be 'end of Iran' | Graham tells Trump to 'stand firm' | Budget talks begin MORE (S.C.) have been briefed on the most important details of the plan, Axios noted, adding that most GOP lawmakers remain in the dark about what the bill will contain.

The president has pushed Congress to act on immigration for months, citing the growing number of apprehensions along the U.S. southern border of migrants suspected of crossing the border illegally.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) chief Kevin McAleenan said last month that his agency is at a "breaking point."

“Two weeks ago, I briefed the media and testified in Congress that our immigration system was at the breaking point. That breaking point has arrived this week at our border," McAleenan said in late March.

"CBP is facing an unprecedented humanitarian and border security crisis all along our southwest border and nowhere has that crisis manifested more acutely than here in El Paso,” he added.