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Kushner saying immigration plan will be 'neutral' on legal admissions: report

Kushner saying immigration plan will be 'neutral' on legal admissions: report
© Stefani Reynolds

White House senior adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerNew Kushner group aims to promote relations between Arab states, Israel Republicans request documents on Kerry's security clearance process Iran moves closer to a diplomatic breakthrough that may upset Israel MORE has reportedly told associates that a plan to reform the U.S. immigration system he is working on will not affect the overall number of legal admissions into the United States.

Axios reported Wednesday that Kushner has told people involved with the effort that his plan will be "neutral" on overall immigration levels, and will seek to reduce the number of immigrants coming in due to family relationships while increasing the number of high-skilled immigrants admitted for work visas.

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Multiple sources told the news outlet that Kushner said the plan will address issues such as visa overstays and seasonal workers, and that he hopes to present the plan to President TrumpDonald TrumpVeteran accused in alleged border wall scheme faces new charges Arizona Republicans to brush off DOJ concern about election audit FEC drops investigation into Trump hush money payments MORE in the form of legislation in the coming days.

Kushner has also enlisted the White House Council of Economic Advisers to study the plan and "make sure the plan has positive effects on GDP [gross domestic product] growth and wage growth," according to one person familiar with the efforts.

Some Republican senators including Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeRepublicans urge probe into Amazon government cloud-computing bid: report Allowing a racist slur against Tim Scott to trend confirms social media's activist bias Senate passes bipartisan B water infrastructure bill MORE (Utah), John CornynJohn CornynTim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Cornyn is most prolific tweeter in Congress so far in 2021 Schumer 'exploring' passing immigration unilaterally if talks unravel MORE (Texas) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHouse to advance appropriations bills in June, July The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  The Memo: The GOP's war is already over — Trump won MORE (S.C.) have been briefed on the most important details of the plan, Axios noted, adding that most GOP lawmakers remain in the dark about what the bill will contain.

The president has pushed Congress to act on immigration for months, citing the growing number of apprehensions along the U.S. southern border of migrants suspected of crossing the border illegally.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) chief Kevin McAleenan said last month that his agency is at a "breaking point."

“Two weeks ago, I briefed the media and testified in Congress that our immigration system was at the breaking point. That breaking point has arrived this week at our border," McAleenan said in late March.

"CBP is facing an unprecedented humanitarian and border security crisis all along our southwest border and nowhere has that crisis manifested more acutely than here in El Paso,” he added.