Kushner saying immigration plan will be 'neutral' on legal admissions: report

Kushner saying immigration plan will be 'neutral' on legal admissions: report
© Stefani Reynolds

White House senior adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerThe Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment White House abruptly cancels Trump meeting with GOP leaders The Hill's Morning Report — Trump retreats on census citizenship question MORE has reportedly told associates that a plan to reform the U.S. immigration system he is working on will not affect the overall number of legal admissions into the United States.

Axios reported Wednesday that Kushner has told people involved with the effort that his plan will be "neutral" on overall immigration levels, and will seek to reduce the number of immigrants coming in due to family relationships while increasing the number of high-skilled immigrants admitted for work visas.

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Multiple sources told the news outlet that Kushner said the plan will address issues such as visa overstays and seasonal workers, and that he hopes to present the plan to President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE in the form of legislation in the coming days.

Kushner has also enlisted the White House Council of Economic Advisers to study the plan and "make sure the plan has positive effects on GDP [gross domestic product] growth and wage growth," according to one person familiar with the efforts.

Some Republican senators including Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate ratifies long-stalled tax treaty On The Money: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency | Tech giants on defensive at antitrust hearing | Democrats ask Labor Department to investigate Amazon warehouses Liberal think tank: GOP paid parental leave proposals are too narrow MORE (Utah), John CornynJohn CornynTrump angry more Republicans haven't defended his tweets: report White House, Congress inch toward debt, budget deal White House abruptly cancels Trump meeting with GOP leaders MORE (Texas) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump digs in ahead of House vote to condemn tweet Why Trump's bigoted tropes won't work in 2020 The Memo: Toxic 2020 is unavoidable conclusion from Trump tweets MORE (S.C.) have been briefed on the most important details of the plan, Axios noted, adding that most GOP lawmakers remain in the dark about what the bill will contain.

The president has pushed Congress to act on immigration for months, citing the growing number of apprehensions along the U.S. southern border of migrants suspected of crossing the border illegally.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) chief Kevin McAleenan said last month that his agency is at a "breaking point."

“Two weeks ago, I briefed the media and testified in Congress that our immigration system was at the breaking point. That breaking point has arrived this week at our border," McAleenan said in late March.

"CBP is facing an unprecedented humanitarian and border security crisis all along our southwest border and nowhere has that crisis manifested more acutely than here in El Paso,” he added.