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Nielsen was warned not to talk to Trump about new Russian election interference: report

Former Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenWatchdog finds top DOJ officials were 'driving force' behind Trump's child separation policy: NYT More than million in DHS contracts awarded to firm of acting secretary's wife: report DHS IG won't investigate after watchdog said Wolf, Cuccinelli appointments violated law MORE was warned not to brief President TrumpDonald John TrumpJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE on possible Russian interference in the 2020 presidential election, according to The New York Times.

Acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyTrump says he may lower corporate tax rate to 20 percent if reelected Is Social Security safe from the courts? On The Money: House panel pulls Powell into partisan battles | New York considers hiking taxes on the rich | Treasury: Trump's payroll tax deferral won't hurt Social Security MORE reportedly warned Nielsen not to bring the topic up in front of the president, despite Nielsen's concern that the Russians would attempt to influence another U.S. election.

Mulvaney reportedly said it “wasn’t a great subject and should be kept below [the president's] level."

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The reported warning came amid special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's nearly two-year investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, including whether Trump or his associates cooperated in the effort.

Trump has raged over Mueller's probe, regularly calling it a "witch hunt" and "presidential harassment." The investigation concluded in March, finding no criminal conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Despite statements Trump has made that appear to cast doubt on whether Russians sought to influence the vote in 2016, his administration says he accepts that attempts were made.

Nielsen, who left the administration earlier this month, reportedly wanted to organize a Cabinet meeting to discuss strategy for preventing additional attempts in 2020. Three senior Trump administration officials and one former senior administration official described to the Times her frustration at the lack of progress on what she believed was an important national security issue.

Eight U.S. intelligence agencies concluded in January 2017 that Russians interfered in the 2016 election. The heads of multiple agencies have warned of ongoing attempts to infiltrate U.S. elections, although the director of national intelligence did not find any direct interference in the 2018 midterm elections.

Updated at 8:35 a.m.