Trump: I am 'looking hard' at bipartisan infrastructure plan of $1-2 trillion

Trump: I am 'looking hard' at bipartisan infrastructure plan of $1-2 trillion
© Getty Images

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result Trump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Seven years after Sandy Hook, the politics of guns has changed MORE said Saturday that he is "looking hard" at an infrastructure plan that would cost between $1 trillion and $2 trillion, days after Democratic congressional leaders said they reached an agreement with the president to seek a deal on a $2 trillion infrastructure bill.

“There is nothing easy about a USA Infrastructure Plan, especially when our great Country has spent an astounding 7 trillion dollars in the Middle East over the last 19 years, but I am looking hard at a bipartisan plan of 1 to 2 trillion dollars. Badly needed!” Trump tweeted Saturday morning.

Trump's comments came days after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Sherrod Brown backs new North American trade deal: 'This will be the first trade agreement I've ever voted for' Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Turf war derails push on surprise medical bills | Bill would tax e-cigarettes to pay for anti-vaping campaign | .5M ad blitz backs vulnerable Dems on drug prices MORE (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTurf war derails bipartisan push on surprise medical bills Senate confirms Trump's nominee to lead FDA CEO group pushes Trump, Congress on paid family, medical leave MORE (D-N.Y.) met with the president on Tuesday. Schumer said after the sit-down that “there was goodwill” on both sides toward crafting a major piece of legislation on infrastructure.

The Democratic leaders, however, cautioned that the parties had not decided on how to fund the $2 trillion package that aims to improve U.S. roads, bridges, waterways and broadband. They will meet again in three weeks to solicit Trump’s ideas on funding.

ADVERTISEMENT

Despite the rare bipartisan development, Trump still faces stiff opposition from the GOP in his desire for such a sweeping infrastructure package.

The agreement between Trump and Democratic leadership was met with concern from conservatives on Capitol Hill over how the government would pay for the infrastructure plan, with many Republicans voicing resistance to raising taxes to secure the funds.

“You would have to have a gas tax to do it, and we’re not for a gas tax,” Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — Sparks fly as House Judiciary debates impeachment articles Democrats object to Meadows passing note to Jordan from dais Meadows says he's advocating for Trump to add Alan Dershowitz to impeachment defense team MORE (R-N.C.) told The Hill on Thursday. “I mean, $1 trillion you could maybe do; $2 trillion, there is no way to get the money other than raising taxes and there is not an appetite for an increase in taxes by Republicans in the House or the Senate.” 

“No, I wouldn’t raise taxes,” said Sen. Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesBullock drops White House bid, won't run for Senate Senate approves stopgap bill to prevent shutdown Perry replacement moves closer to confirmation despite questions on Ukraine MORE (R-Mont.). “That’s going to be the heaviest lift of all of this, is figuring out a way here from a fiscal viewpoint making this affordable on our current balance sheet.”

Republicans, who are seeking a major legislative win ahead of the 2020 election, have floated various plans to pay for an infrastructure plan.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyOn The Money: Trump, China announce 'Phase One' trade deal | Supreme Court takes up fight over Trump financial records | House panel schedules hearing, vote on new NAFTA deal House panel to hold hearing, vote on Trump's new NAFTA proposal House passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices MORE (R-Calif.) suggested selling government lands, while Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPentagon to take bigger role in vetting foreign students after Pensacola shooting Overnight Defense: House passes compromise defense bill | Turkey sanctions advance in Senate over Trump objections | Top general says military won't be 'raping, burning and pillaging' after Trump pardons Rand Paul: 'We need to re-examine' US-Saudi relationship after Florida shooting MORE (R-Ky.) said the administration could pay for infrastructure by withdrawing troops from Afghanistan and other combat zones.