Trump: I am 'looking hard' at bipartisan infrastructure plan of $1-2 trillion

Trump: I am 'looking hard' at bipartisan infrastructure plan of $1-2 trillion
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President TrumpDonald John Trump5 things to know about Boris Johnson Conservatives erupt in outrage against budget deal Trump says Omar will help him win Minnesota MORE said Saturday that he is "looking hard" at an infrastructure plan that would cost between $1 trillion and $2 trillion, days after Democratic congressional leaders said they reached an agreement with the president to seek a deal on a $2 trillion infrastructure bill.

“There is nothing easy about a USA Infrastructure Plan, especially when our great Country has spent an astounding 7 trillion dollars in the Middle East over the last 19 years, but I am looking hard at a bipartisan plan of 1 to 2 trillion dollars. Badly needed!” Trump tweeted Saturday morning.

Trump's comments came days after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiConservatives erupt in outrage against budget deal Grassley, Wyden reach deal to lower drug prices Why do Republicans keep trying to outspend Democrats in Congress? MORE (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOn The Money: Trump, Congress reach two-year budget, debt limit deal | What we know | Deal gets pushback from conservatives | Equifax to pay up to 0M in data breach settlement | Warren warns another 'crash' is coming Overnight Defense: Iran's spy claim adds to tensions with US | Trump, lawmakers get two-year budget deal | Trump claims he could win Afghan war in a week Trump, Democrats clinch two-year budget deal MORE (D-N.Y.) met with the president on Tuesday. Schumer said after the sit-down that “there was goodwill” on both sides toward crafting a major piece of legislation on infrastructure.

The Democratic leaders, however, cautioned that the parties had not decided on how to fund the $2 trillion package that aims to improve U.S. roads, bridges, waterways and broadband. They will meet again in three weeks to solicit Trump’s ideas on funding.

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Despite the rare bipartisan development, Trump still faces stiff opposition from the GOP in his desire for such a sweeping infrastructure package.

The agreement between Trump and Democratic leadership was met with concern from conservatives on Capitol Hill over how the government would pay for the infrastructure plan, with many Republicans voicing resistance to raising taxes to secure the funds.

“You would have to have a gas tax to do it, and we’re not for a gas tax,” Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsConservatives erupt in outrage against budget deal Lawmakers request documents on DC councilman ethics investigation House Republicans dismissive of Paul Ryan's take on Trump MORE (R-N.C.) told The Hill on Thursday. “I mean, $1 trillion you could maybe do; $2 trillion, there is no way to get the money other than raising taxes and there is not an appetite for an increase in taxes by Republicans in the House or the Senate.” 

“No, I wouldn’t raise taxes,” said Sen. Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesTwo GOP lawmakers back Trump's comments on Democratic lawmakers: 'I'll pay for their tickets out of this country' Former Navy officer, teacher enters race to unseat GOP senator in Montana Democratic senators want candidates to take Swalwell's hint and drop out MORE (R-Mont.). “That’s going to be the heaviest lift of all of this, is figuring out a way here from a fiscal viewpoint making this affordable on our current balance sheet.”

Republicans, who are seeking a major legislative win ahead of the 2020 election, have floated various plans to pay for an infrastructure plan.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump applauds two-year budget deal with 0 billion spending hike On The Money: Trump, Congress reach two-year budget, debt limit deal | What we know | Deal gets pushback from conservatives | Equifax to pay up to 0M in data breach settlement | Warren warns another 'crash' is coming Overnight Defense: Iran's spy claim adds to tensions with US | Trump, lawmakers get two-year budget deal | Trump claims he could win Afghan war in a week MORE (R-Calif.) suggested selling government lands, while Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump applauds two-year budget deal with 0 billion spending hike The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony This week: Mueller dominates chaotic week on Capitol Hill MORE (R-Ky.) said the administration could pay for infrastructure by withdrawing troops from Afghanistan and other combat zones.