Trump: I am 'looking hard' at bipartisan infrastructure plan of $1-2 trillion

Trump: I am 'looking hard' at bipartisan infrastructure plan of $1-2 trillion
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpBusiness, ballots and battling opioids: Why the Universal Postal Union benefits the US Sanders supporters cry foul over Working Families endorsement of Warren California poll: Biden, Sanders lead Democratic field; Harris takes fifth MORE said Saturday that he is "looking hard" at an infrastructure plan that would cost between $1 trillion and $2 trillion, days after Democratic congressional leaders said they reached an agreement with the president to seek a deal on a $2 trillion infrastructure bill.

“There is nothing easy about a USA Infrastructure Plan, especially when our great Country has spent an astounding 7 trillion dollars in the Middle East over the last 19 years, but I am looking hard at a bipartisan plan of 1 to 2 trillion dollars. Badly needed!” Trump tweeted Saturday morning.

Trump's comments came days after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPence says it's 'vital' for Congress to pass US-Mexico-Canada trade deal The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump heads to California Obama, Bush among those paying tribute to Cokie Roberts: 'A trailblazing figure' MORE (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer, Pelosi push Trump to back universal background check bill Sinema says she would back Kennedy in race against Markey Democrats threaten to withhold defense votes over wall MORE (D-N.Y.) met with the president on Tuesday. Schumer said after the sit-down that “there was goodwill” on both sides toward crafting a major piece of legislation on infrastructure.

The Democratic leaders, however, cautioned that the parties had not decided on how to fund the $2 trillion package that aims to improve U.S. roads, bridges, waterways and broadband. They will meet again in three weeks to solicit Trump’s ideas on funding.

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Despite the rare bipartisan development, Trump still faces stiff opposition from the GOP in his desire for such a sweeping infrastructure package.

The agreement between Trump and Democratic leadership was met with concern from conservatives on Capitol Hill over how the government would pay for the infrastructure plan, with many Republicans voicing resistance to raising taxes to secure the funds.

“You would have to have a gas tax to do it, and we’re not for a gas tax,” Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsMeadows, Cotton introduce bill to prevent district judges from blocking federal policy changes The Hill's Morning Report - Trump ousts Bolton; GOP exhales after win in NC Meadows to be replaced by Biggs as Freedom Caucus leader MORE (R-N.C.) told The Hill on Thursday. “I mean, $1 trillion you could maybe do; $2 trillion, there is no way to get the money other than raising taxes and there is not an appetite for an increase in taxes by Republicans in the House or the Senate.” 

“No, I wouldn’t raise taxes,” said Sen. Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesConservatives offer stark warning to Trump, GOP on background checks The 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal 5 takeaways from combative Democratic debate MORE (R-Mont.). “That’s going to be the heaviest lift of all of this, is figuring out a way here from a fiscal viewpoint making this affordable on our current balance sheet.”

Republicans, who are seeking a major legislative win ahead of the 2020 election, have floated various plans to pay for an infrastructure plan.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyTrump touts Washington Post story on GOP support Pence extends olive branch to Cummings after Trump's Baltimore attacks Marijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis MORE (R-Calif.) suggested selling government lands, while Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand Paul: Almost every mass shooter 'is sending off signals' Liz Cheney says world is more stable, 'safer' under Trump Sunday shows preview: Democratic candidates make the rounds after debate MORE (R-Ky.) said the administration could pay for infrastructure by withdrawing troops from Afghanistan and other combat zones.