Trump lashes out at Dem talk of 'constitutional crisis'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff blasts Trump for making 'false claims' about Russia intel: 'You've betrayed America. Again.' Poll: Sanders leads 2020 Democratic field with 28 percent, followed by Warren and Biden More than 6 in 10 expect Trump to be reelected: poll MORE on Sunday took to Twitter to excoriate Democrats and the media over the suggestion that the U.S. is facing a constitutional crisis, calling the assertion "a pathetically untrue soundbite."

"The Democrats new and pathetically untrue sound bite is that we are in a 'Constitutional Crisis,'" Trump wrote in multiple tweets. "They and their partner, the Fake News Media, are all told to say this as loud and as often as possible. They are a sad JOKE! We may have the strongest Economy in our history, best employment numbers ever, low taxes & regulations, a rebuilt military & V.A., many great new judges, & so much more."

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Trump went on to claim that the real constitutional crisis is "a giant SCAM perpetrated upon our nation, a Witch Hunt, a Treasonous Hoax." The president has often used those terms to describe the FBI and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's investigations into Russia's election interference. He later said the Democrats were acting like "crazed lunatics" in the wake of the Mueller probe's end and that the only constitutional crisis is "the Democrats refusing to work."

His tweets come after prominent Democrats, including Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump's Intel moves spark Democratic fury Buttigieg sounds alarm after Sanders wins Nevada Russian interference reports rock Capitol Hill MORE (Calif.) and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerTrump adviser presses House investigators to make Bezos testify Nadler demands answers from Barr on 'new channel' for receiving Ukraine info from Giuliani Trump predicts Ocasio-Cortez will launch primary bid against Schumer MORE (N.Y.), last week made the assertion that the country is experiencing a constitutional crisis.

Nadler made his comments after his panel voted to hold Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrBill Barr is trying his best to be Trump's Roy Cohn Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter split on Bloomberg video | Sanders briefed on Russian efforts to help campaign | Barr to meet with Republicans ahead of surveillance fight Sanders says he was briefed on Russian effort to help campaign MORE in contempt for failing to turn over an unredacted version of Mueller's final report. 

"We’ve talked for a long time about approaching a constitutional crisis. We are now in it,” Nadler told reporters following the vote.

"Now is the time of testing whether we can keep a republic or whether this republic is destined to change into a different, more tyrannical form of government," he added. "We must resist this."

The following day, Pelosi said at a press conference that she agrees with Nadler.

"Yes, I do agree with Chairman Nadler because the administration has decided that they're not going to honor their oath of office," she said.

It's unclear how congressional Democrats will move forward in response to the fallout from Mueller's report. Pelosi has not said if the full House will vote on the contempt resolution against Barr.

Many progressive Democrats, meanwhile, including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez claps back after article on her dress: 'Sequins are a great accessory to universal healthcare' Democrats working to ensure Trump's second term Ocasio-Cortez announces slate of all-female congressional endorsements MORE (N.Y.), have called for the House to begin an investigation into whether Trump should be impeached. 

However, Pelosi has steadfastly resisted to go forward with impeachment, arguing that it's a distraction and not the most effective way to win as the U.S. heads into an election year.