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Trump lashes out at Dem talk of 'constitutional crisis'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Biden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country Biden says family will avoid business conflicts MORE on Sunday took to Twitter to excoriate Democrats and the media over the suggestion that the U.S. is facing a constitutional crisis, calling the assertion "a pathetically untrue soundbite."

"The Democrats new and pathetically untrue sound bite is that we are in a 'Constitutional Crisis,'" Trump wrote in multiple tweets. "They and their partner, the Fake News Media, are all told to say this as loud and as often as possible. They are a sad JOKE! We may have the strongest Economy in our history, best employment numbers ever, low taxes & regulations, a rebuilt military & V.A., many great new judges, & so much more."

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Trump went on to claim that the real constitutional crisis is "a giant SCAM perpetrated upon our nation, a Witch Hunt, a Treasonous Hoax." The president has often used those terms to describe the FBI and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerBarr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting MORE's investigations into Russia's election interference. He later said the Democrats were acting like "crazed lunatics" in the wake of the Mueller probe's end and that the only constitutional crisis is "the Democrats refusing to work."

His tweets come after prominent Democrats, including Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBiden backs 0B compromise coronavirus stimulus bill US records over 14 million coronavirus cases On The Money: COVID-19 relief picks up steam as McConnell, Pelosi hold talks | Slowing job growth raises fears of double-dip recession | Biden officially announces Brian Deese as top economic adviser MORE (Calif.) and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerThis week: Congress races to wrap work for the year Top Republicans praise Trump's Flynn pardon Democratic impeachment leaders blast Trump's pardon of Flynn MORE (N.Y.), last week made the assertion that the country is experiencing a constitutional crisis.

Nadler made his comments after his panel voted to hold Attorney General William BarrBill BarrBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Trump campaign, RNC announce 0 million post-election fundraising haul Michigan voter fraud hearing goes viral for alleged flatulence, unruly witness MORE in contempt for failing to turn over an unredacted version of Mueller's final report. 

"We’ve talked for a long time about approaching a constitutional crisis. We are now in it,” Nadler told reporters following the vote.

"Now is the time of testing whether we can keep a republic or whether this republic is destined to change into a different, more tyrannical form of government," he added. "We must resist this."

The following day, Pelosi said at a press conference that she agrees with Nadler.

"Yes, I do agree with Chairman Nadler because the administration has decided that they're not going to honor their oath of office," she said.

It's unclear how congressional Democrats will move forward in response to the fallout from Mueller's report. Pelosi has not said if the full House will vote on the contempt resolution against Barr.

Many progressive Democrats, meanwhile, including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHarry Styles hits back at criticism over wearing dress on Vogue cover 'It's not a slogan': Progressives push back on Obama's comments on 'defund the police' movement Obama says Democrats should make sure Ocasio-Cortez has a platform MORE (N.Y.), have called for the House to begin an investigation into whether Trump should be impeached. 

However, Pelosi has steadfastly resisted to go forward with impeachment, arguing that it's a distraction and not the most effective way to win as the U.S. heads into an election year.