Trump to meet with Moon in South Korea as part of G-20 trip

Trump to meet with Moon in South Korea as part of G-20 trip
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpMulvaney: 'We've overreacted a little bit' to coronavirus Former CBS News president: Most major cable news outlets 'unrelentingly liberal' in 'fear and loathing' of Trump An old man like me should be made more vulnerable to death by COVID-19 MORE will travel to South Korea to meet with President Moon Jae-in as part of a trip to Asia in late June for the Group of 20 (G-20) summit, the White House announced Wednesday.

"President Trump and President Moon will continue their close coordination on efforts to achieve the final, fully verified denuclearization of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea," press secretary Sarah HuckabeeSarah Elizabeth SandersMcEnany stamps her brand on White House press operation Sanders mocks NY Times urging DNC to investigate Biden allegations: 'I thought it was an Onion headline' Donald Trump: The Boomer TV president MORE Sanders said in a statement. "The two leaders will also discuss ways to strengthen the United States–Republic of Korea alliance and the friendship between our two peoples."

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The White House did not specify a date for the meeting, but said it will come in conjunction with Trump's trip to Osaka, Japan, the host site of this year's G-20 gathering.

The G-20 will take place on June 28 and 29. Trump said Monday he will meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinAmerica's post-COVID-19 foreign policy House Democrats object to Trump sending ventilators to Russia Overnight Defense: Trump to withdraw US from Open Skies Treaty | Pentagon drops ban on recruits who had virus | FBI says Corpus Christi shooting terror-related MORE while attending the summit.

Trump most recently met with Moon at the White House last month. The two leaders have been in frequent contact amid a push to get North Korean leader Kim Jong UnKim Jong UnKim Jong Un seeks to continue bolstering North Korea's nuclear capabilities, state media says Overnight Defense: State Dept. watchdog was investigating emergency Saudi arms sales before ouster | Pompeo says he requested watchdog be fired for 'undermining' department | Pensacola naval base shooter had 'significant ties' to al Qaeda, Barr says Trump says investigation into Pompeo shows 'screwed up' priorities MORE to abandon his nuclear program.

Those efforts have been scrambled in recent weeks after North Korea was said to have launched short-range projectiles, the first such tests since 2017.

Trump has said he's looking into the test launches, but has expressed faith that Kim will come back to the negotiating table because of the economic incentives.

"The relationship continues, but we’ll see what happens," he said last week. "I know they want to negotiate, they’re talking about negotiating, but I don’t think they’re ready to negotiate.”

Trump has met one-on-one with Kim twice in the past year. The two held negotiations in Singapore last summer and engaged in talks in Vietnam earlier this year. The latter summit between the two leaders ended abruptly and without concrete next steps toward denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.