Liz Cheney: Statements by agents investigating Trump 'could well be treason'

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyGOP calls for minority hearing on impeachment, threatens procedural measures Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Stopgap spending bill includes military pay raise | Schumer presses Pentagon to protect impeachment witnesses | US ends civil-nuclear waiver in Iran Cruz, Graham and Cheney call on Trump to end all nuclear waivers for Iran MORE (R-Wyo.) said on Sunday that statements by FBI agents investigating President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial Vulnerable Democrats tout legislative wins, not impeachment Trump appears to set personal record for tweets in a day MORE sounded “an awful lot like a coup, and it could well be treason.”

Cheney told Martha Raddatz on ABC’s “This Week” that the beginnings of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerJeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House panel debates articles of impeachment Trump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts MORE's Russia investigation were suspect and need to be investigated. 

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She specifically went after texts exchanged by former FBI officials Peter Strzok and Lisa Page that were critical of Trump and have sparked a Republican effort to investigate potential bias within the Department of Justice against Trump, adding that officials needed to ascertain former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyHuckabee teases Hannity appearance, says he'll explain why Trump is eligible for third term Five takeaways on Horowitz's testimony on Capitol Hill Horowitz offers troubling picture of FBI's Trump campaign probe MORE’s and Deputy Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeMcCabe: Being accused of treason by Trump 'quite honestly terrifying' Horowitz report is damning for the FBI and unsettling for the rest of us Fox's Chris Wallace: IG report headline is 'It didn't find the things that Bill Barr and Donald Trump alleged' MORE’s roles in the investigation as well.

“Think about the fact that we had people that are at the highest levels of our law enforcement in this nation saying that they were going to stop a duly elected president of the United States, saying they needed an insurance policy against him,” Cheney said.

“That is something that simply cannot happen. We have to have confidence in our law enforcement, and the attorney general has got to get to the bottom of what happened, how it was that those people were allowed to misuse and abuse their power that way,” she added.

White House press secretary Sarah HuckabeeSarah Elizabeth SandersBill Press: Mulvaney proves need for daily briefings White House correspondent April Ryan to moderate fundraising event for Buttigieg White House press secretary defends lack of daily briefings: Trump 'is the most accessible president in history' MORE Sanders said in a separate interview on Sunday that the Trump administration “already” knows that there was a high level of corruption at the FBI.

"We already know that there was an outrageous amount of corruption that took place at the F.B.I. They leaked information. They lied. They were specifically working trying to take down the president, trying to hurt the president," Sanders said on NBC's "Meet The Press."

"We'll leave the final call up to the attorney general and he'll get to the bottom of it. But we think Americans deserve the truth. The president's asked for that. And we should expect nothing less,” she added.

President Trump last week last week gave Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrHolder rips into William Barr: 'He is unfit to lead the Justice Department' Five takeaways on Horowitz's testimony on Capitol Hill Budowsky: Would John McCain back impeachment? MORE new authorities to examine and possibly release classified material related to the Justice Department’s inquiry into the origins of the Russia investigation.