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Kellyanne Conway dismisses Hatch Act violation: 'Let me know when the jail sentence starts'

White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayMelania Trump to hit campaign trail in Pennsylvania White House to host swearing-in event for Barrett on Monday night Pence adviser Marty Obst tests positive for COVID-19 MORE on Wednesday scoffed at a government office's findings that she violated a decades-old law barring officials from weighing in on elections in their government capacity as she railed against Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenDemocrats warn GOP will regret Barrett confirmation Trump campaign eyes election night party at his sold-out DC hotel Harris blasts GOP for confirming Amy Coney Barrett: 'We won't forget this' MORE's record.

Conway tore into the former vice president and senator over his vote on the 1994 crime bill, his role in overseeing the 1991 Anita HillAnita Faye HillAnita Hill says she'll vote for Biden Biden set to accept nomination in convention-closing address 50 years covering Biden MORE hearing and his record on immigration as she fielded questions from reporters outside the White House. But she insisted she was not commenting on the 2020 election and that she has a right to size up the record of her boss's potential opponent.

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"I’m going to talk about people’s records because I have the right to," Conway said.

"I’m not concerned about Joe Biden," she added. "I’m concerned about the failures of the last administration to deal with the issues of the day, including North Korea."

When reporters noted the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) found she violated the Hatch Act with two interviews she gave in late 2017, Conway was dismissive.

"Blah, blah, blah," she said as one reporter recounted the OSC's findings.

"If you’re trying to silence me through the Hatch Act, it’s not going to work," Conway said.

"Let me know when the jail sentence starts," she added.

The OSC — an entity separate from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's Russia investigation — determined in March 2018 that Conway had violated the Hatch Act with two separate interviews related to the Alabama Senate special election in 2017.

The report cited interviews Conway gave in her official capacity to "Fox & Friends" on Fox News and "New Day" on CNN in which she described then-candidate Doug Jones as "weak on crime" and a likely vote against Trump-backed tax cuts. Jones went on to defeat Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreLong-shot Espy campaign sees national boost in weeks before election Ocasio-Cortez slams Tulsi Gabbard for amplifying ballot harvesting video Doug Jones says he will not support Supreme Court nominee before election MORE.

The OSC referred its findings to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump admin to announce coronavirus vaccine will be covered under Medicare, Medicaid: report Election officials say they're getting suspicious emails that may be part of malicious attack on voting: report McConnell tees up Trump judicial pick following Supreme Court vote MORE "for appropriate disciplinary action."

However, the White House maintained at the time Conway had done nothing wrong, saying she did not explicitly tell viewers which candidate to vote for.

In response to an assertion by Conway that she was misquoted in the March 2018 report outlining her violation, an OSC spokesman told The Hill in a statement that the agency "stands by its findings."

Under the Hatch Act, enacted in 1939, federal employees are barred from making partisan comments that could sway an election or advocating for political candidates while using their official designations. Civil penalties for violations can include fines or dismissal.

Politico reported that formal complaints to the OSC about potential Hatch Act violations increased nearly 30 percent during Trump's first year in office.

Updated at 12:53 p.m.