Kellyanne Conway dismisses Hatch Act violation: 'Let me know when the jail sentence starts'

White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayTrump takes aim at media after 'hereby' ordering US businesses out of China The White House and schools have this in common: Asbestos George Conway: 'I hereby order White House staff' to admit Trump to 'Walter Reed' MORE on Wednesday scoffed at a government office's findings that she violated a decades-old law barring officials from weighing in on elections in their government capacity as she railed against Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden evokes 1968, asks voters to imagine if Obama had been assassinated Biden blasts Trump's 'embarrassing' actions heading into G-7 summit Steyer calls on DNC to expand polling criteria for debates MORE's record.

Conway tore into the former vice president and senator over his vote on the 1994 crime bill, his role in overseeing the 1991 Anita HillAnita Faye HillAnita Hill: I could see myself voting for Biden over Trump Bill Maher: Buttigieg a 'little too young' to be president What I saw at the last impeachment: Rules are for little people MORE hearing and his record on immigration as she fielded questions from reporters outside the White House. But she insisted she was not commenting on the 2020 election and that she has a right to size up the record of her boss's potential opponent.

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"I’m going to talk about people’s records because I have the right to," Conway said.

"I’m not concerned about Joe Biden," she added. "I’m concerned about the failures of the last administration to deal with the issues of the day, including North Korea."

When reporters noted the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) found she violated the Hatch Act with two interviews she gave in late 2017, Conway was dismissive.

"Blah, blah, blah," she said as one reporter recounted the OSC's findings.

"If you’re trying to silence me through the Hatch Act, it’s not going to work," Conway said.

"Let me know when the jail sentence starts," she added.

The OSC — an entity separate from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE's Russia investigation — determined in March 2018 that Conway had violated the Hatch Act with two separate interviews related to the Alabama Senate special election in 2017.

The report cited interviews Conway gave in her official capacity to "Fox & Friends" on Fox News and "New Day" on CNN in which she described then-candidate Doug Jones as "weak on crime" and a likely vote against Trump-backed tax cuts. Jones went on to defeat Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreGOP Senate candidate 'pissed off' at Trump over health care for veterans Durbin says he has second thoughts about asking for Franken's resignation Alabama GOP senate candidate says 'homosexual activities' have ruined TV, country's moral core MORE.

The OSC referred its findings to President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE "for appropriate disciplinary action."

However, the White House maintained at the time Conway had done nothing wrong, saying she did not explicitly tell viewers which candidate to vote for.

In response to an assertion by Conway that she was misquoted in the March 2018 report outlining her violation, an OSC spokesman told The Hill in a statement that the agency "stands by its findings."

Under the Hatch Act, enacted in 1939, federal employees are barred from making partisan comments that could sway an election or advocating for political candidates while using their official designations. Civil penalties for violations can include fines or dismissal.

Politico reported that formal complaints to the OSC about potential Hatch Act violations increased nearly 30 percent during Trump's first year in office.

Updated at 12:53 p.m.