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Trump signs long-awaited $19.1B disaster aid bill

Trump signs long-awaited $19.1B disaster aid bill
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President TrumpDonald TrumpFreedom Caucus member condemns GOP group pushing 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell's new free speech site to ban certain curse words Secret Facebook groups of special operations officers include racist comments, QAnon posts: report MORE on Thursday signed the $19.1 billion disaster relief package that passed the House on Monday.

"Just signed Disaster Aid Bill to help Americans who have been hit by recent catastrophic storms. So important for our GREAT American farmers and ranchers. Help for GA, FL, IA, NE, NC, and CA. Puerto Rico should love President Trump. Without me, they would have been shut out!" he tweeted Thursday afternoon. 

Trump agreed to support the legislation — aimed at providing funding to recovery efforts in areas affected by wildfires, hurricanes and flooding — ahead of Congress’s Memorial Day recess despite the Senate opting not to comply with the administration's request to include $4.5 billion in border funding.

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Democrats also gained a significant win with the bill including $900 million — $600 million in food stamp money and an additional $300 million in Housing and Urban Development grants — for Puerto Rico, a provision initially opposed by Trump, who argued the amount was excessive and alleged the island previously mismanaged the aid sent following Hurricane Maria.

The long-stalled disaster aid bill passed the upper chamber on May 23 after GOP senators struck a deal with Trump to drop certain provisions from the legislation.

The House sought to move the bill three times by unanimous consent during Congress’s Memorial Day recess, but the vote was blocked by three conservative members — GOP Reps. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyUS Chamber enters hostile takeover by crony capitalists Exclusive: Biggs offers bill banning federal vaccine passports Both parties look to recruit Asian American candidates as violence against group increases MORE (Texas), Thomas MassieThomas Harold Massie14 Republicans vote against resolution condemning Myanmar military coup House approves bills tightening background checks on guns Can members of Congress carry firearms on the Capitol complex? MORE (Ky.) and John RoseJohn Williams RoseREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Why your neighborhood community pharmacy may close From state agriculture departments to Congress: Our farmers need the USMCA MORE (Tenn.) — moves that each time sparked a flurry of bipartisan criticism.

Republican critics of the bill cited concerns with its impact on the national debt and disapproval of its lack of border funding.

“The American people send their representatives to Washington to represent them. They deserve to see how we vote. While I'm happy the Speaker chose to go back to regular procedure, I am still troubled we're poised to spend $19 billion that is not paid for when we are racking up $100 million an hour in national debt,” Roy said on the floor Monday.