Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment?

The nearly 60 House Democrats publicly supportive of launching an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren unveils Native American policy plan Live-action 'Mulan' star spurs calls for boycott with support of Hong Kong police Don't let other countries unfairly tax America's most innovative companies MORE represent a microcosm of the caucus, showing how fervor is spreading across diverse factions despite leadership's efforts to contain it.

Most of the members who support an impeachment inquiry are liberal. They include much of the Congressional Progressive Caucus leadership as well as 17 members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), whose members have long been among the most outspoken on impeachment.

Half of the members of the House Judiciary Committee, which would be charged with impeachment proceedings, already support launching an inquiry.

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And while Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy Trump crosses new line with Omar, Tlaib, Israel move Pelosi: Israel's Omar-Tlaib decision 'a sign of weakness' MORE (D-Calif.) is opposed to impeachment, at least 11 of her home-state colleagues have come out in favor of moving forward.

The key constituency most reluctant to push ahead with impeachment are the swing-state members who helped Democrats retake their majority. So far, Rep. Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiDemocrats call for Pelosi to cut recess short to address white nationalism House votes to kill impeachment effort against Trump The four Republicans who voted to condemn Trump's tweets MORE (N.J.) is the only Democrat who flipped a GOP-held district last fall to back starting an inquiry.

The Hill’s whip list currently lists 58 Democrats in support of an impeachment inquiry. Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashLawmakers blast Trump as Israel bars door to Tlaib and Omar House Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 Sanford headed to New Hampshire amid talk of challenge to Trump MORE (Mich.) is the only Republican to say Trump engaged in impeachable conduct.

About two-thirds of the Democrats publicly in favor of starting an impeachment inquiry are members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

They include the two Progressive Caucus co-chairmen, Reps. Mark PocanMark William PocanTrump crosses new line with Omar, Tlaib, Israel move Liberal Democrat eyes aid cuts to Israel after Omar, Tlaib denied entry Democrats give cold shoulder to Warren wealth tax MORE (Wis.) and Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalMedicare for all: fears and facts House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death 'KamalaCare' fails to address big problem: That we cannot trust insurance companies MORE (Wash.), a Judiciary Committee member. Three vice chairmen who also sit on the Judiciary Committee have come out in favor of an impeachment inquiry: Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineDemocrat calls for public review of T-Mobile-Sprint merger agreement Pelosi: Israel's Omar-Tlaib decision 'a sign of weakness' Lawmakers blast Trump as Israel bars door to Tlaib and Omar MORE (R.I.), Joseph Neguse (Colo.) and Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarCongressional Hispanic Caucus calls for answers on Mississippi ICE raids Consoler in Chief like Biden is the perfect antidote to a Divider in Chief like Trump Democratic senator on possibility of Trump standing up to the NRA: 'That's just such BS' MORE (Texas).

Most Progressive Caucus members represent safely blue districts and constituents more supportive of impeachment.

Progressive freshman Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibTlaib says she won't visit Israel after being treated like 'a criminal' The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy Israel approves Tlaib request to visit grandmother in West Bank MORE (Mich.) — who drew attention on her first day in office in January by pledging to “impeach the motherf---er” — introduced a resolution in late March calling for an impeachment inquiry. It now has 12 co-sponsors.

“I think that at this point, it is getting to become so overwhelming that we need to uphold the rule of law and the Constitution of the United States,” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez brushes off Trump tweet claiming she is 'fuming' over Tlaib, Omar attention Trump finds consistent foil in 'Squad' The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy MORE (D-N.Y.), a Tlaib ally, told reporters this week. “I think that the tide is turning with the public.”

One of the most vocal advocates in the House has been Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenWe need a climate plan for agriculture No industry will be impacted by climate change worse than agriculture Five factors that will determine gun control debate MORE (D-Texas), who forced two floor votes on his articles of impeachment in 2017 and 2018.

The articles of impeachment from Green, a CBC member, accused Trump of stoking racial divisions in America.

“At some point we will have to say the word 'impeachment' if we're going to get to impeachment. And I hear people saying that the president should be impeached. So it shouldn't be a difficult thing to say, and hopefully we'll get to it,” Green said.

Just under two-thirds of Green’s CBC colleagues supported his articles of impeachment on the House floor in the last Congress. The bitter feelings toward Trump among black lawmakers began long before the president even took office — when he raised doubts about whether then-President Obama was born in the U.S.

And it’s only gotten worse since Trump engaged in racial controversies such as casting equal blame on white supremacists and counterprotesters for the 2017 violence in Charlottesville, Va., as well as personally attacking multiple members of the CBC.

“Given where the CBC historically has been with respect to this president, we have been the No. 1 company that he rejects. We don't get invited to any meetings,” House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonHillicon Valley: House panel subpoenas 8chan owner | FCC takes step forward on T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Warren wants probe into FTC over Equifax settlement | Groups make new push to end surveillance program House Homeland Security Committee subpoenas 8chan owner What Mississippi ICE raids mean for vulnerable workers MORE (D-Miss.), a CBC member, said on MSNBC’s “Kasie DC.”

Thompson is one of nine Democrats endorsing an impeachment inquiry against Trump who were in office the last time the House voted to impeach a president: Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonThe return of Ken Starr Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress Trump defends promoting conspiracy theory about Epstein's death: 'It was a retweet' MORE in 1998.

He’s also one of five House committee chairmen to call for impeaching Trump, a group that includes Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersBanks give Congress, New York AG documents related to Russians who may have dealt with Trump: report Maxine Waters: Force us to ban assault weapons 'or kick our a--- out of Congress!' Maxine Waters: Escalating killings in US motivated by Trump's 'race baiting' MORE (D-Calif.), Budget Committee Chairman John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthTrump signs two-year budget deal Lawmakers point to entitlements when asked about deficits House Problem Solvers are bringing real change to Congress MORE (D-Ky.), Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.).

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death French officials call for investigation of Epstein 'links with France' National Archives: Trump, Bush can review Democrats' request for Kavanaugh records MORE (D-N.Y.), meanwhile, has been privately pushing Democratic leadership to begin an impeachment inquiry, only to be rebuffed. But half of his committee’s members — many of whom are in safe liberal districts — are already on board with the idea.

“My district's been for impeachment for a long time,” said Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenHouse Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony This week: Mueller dominates chaotic week on Capitol Hill MORE (D-Tenn.), who chairs a Judiciary subcommittee. “It's hard not to get there.”

California, one of the bluest states in the country, has many pro-impeachment voices.

“I think you can count members from every corner of our caucus,” Rep. Jared HuffmanJared William HuffmanDemocrats see window closing for impeachment Appetite for Democratic term limits fizzling out The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller testimony gives Trump a boost as Dems ponder next steps MORE (D-Calif.), who supports impeachment, said in an interview. “You're going to get a lot of Californians simply because we're by far the biggest delegation.”

The group of 11 California Democrats on board with launching an impeachment inquiry now doesn't include Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Maxine Waters says her committee will call in Zuckerberg to testify about Libra MORE (D-Calif.), who reintroduced articles of impeachment on the first day of the new Congress in January.

Sherman said he thinks Democrats should build more public support first. “Impeachment without removal is not where I want to go,” he said.

Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellThe House Democrats who voted to kill impeachment effort House votes to kill impeachment effort against Trump Democratic lawmaker pushes back on Castro's call to repeal law making illegal border crossings a crime MORE (D-Fla.), who flipped a GOP-held district last fall, is among the Judiciary Committee members who haven’t endorsed an impeachment inquiry. But she indicated that it’s on her mind.

“To tell you the truth, I have been thinking more and more about when it would be appropriate to start the inquiry,” Mucarsel-Powell told CNN’s “New Day” on Friday.

“I've read [special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony Kellyanne Conway: 'I'd like to know' if Mueller read his own report MORE's] report. There is clear evidence that this president has obstructed justice, and I think that there have to be serious consequences,” she added.

Another freshman Judiciary Committee member, Rep. Greg StantonGregory (Greg) John StantonWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Arizona Dems ask DHS to appoint 'crisis coordinator' at border Lawmakers push to increase diversity of tech inventors MORE (D-Ariz.), won his race by more than 20 points last fall but represents a district that’s been targeted by the GOP in recent years. He’s already on board with an impeachment inquiry.

“I accept that this conclusion will be unpopular with some, but it is the right thing to do,” Stanton said.

And while the nearly 60 House Democrats publicly supportive of impeachment represent only about a quarter of the 235-member caucus, Huffman said he’s heard privately from colleagues who are more are on board than they’re letting on.

“I know the number’s higher,” Huffman said. “But many members don't want to get ahead of leadership. And so that's the delicate process that is underway.”

Mike Lillis contributed to this story.