Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment?

The nearly 60 House Democrats publicly supportive of launching an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Democrats worried by Jeremy Corbyn's UK rise amid anti-Semitism Warren, Buttigieg duke it out in sprint to 2020 MORE represent a microcosm of the caucus, showing how fervor is spreading across diverse factions despite leadership's efforts to contain it.

Most of the members who support an impeachment inquiry are liberal. They include much of the Congressional Progressive Caucus leadership as well as 17 members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), whose members have long been among the most outspoken on impeachment.

Half of the members of the House Judiciary Committee, which would be charged with impeachment proceedings, already support launching an inquiry.

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And while Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Democrats seek leverage for trial The Memo: Pelosi-Trump trade deal provokes debate on left MORE (D-Calif.) is opposed to impeachment, at least 11 of her home-state colleagues have come out in favor of moving forward.

The key constituency most reluctant to push ahead with impeachment are the swing-state members who helped Democrats retake their majority. So far, Rep. Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiVulnerable Democrats feel heat ahead of impeachment vote Democrats reach cusp of impeachment Pelosi's whiplash moment brings praise and criticism MORE (N.J.) is the only Democrat who flipped a GOP-held district last fall to back starting an inquiry.

The Hill’s whip list currently lists 58 Democrats in support of an impeachment inquiry. Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashGroup of Democrats floating censure of Trump instead of impeachment: report Democrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Here are the Senate Republicans who could vote to convict Trump MORE (Mich.) is the only Republican to say Trump engaged in impeachable conduct.

About two-thirds of the Democrats publicly in favor of starting an impeachment inquiry are members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

They include the two Progressive Caucus co-chairmen, Reps. Mark PocanMark William PocanOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — House panel unveils rival fix for surprise medical bills | Democrats punt vote on youth vaping bill | Pelosi drug bill poised for passage after deal with progressives Pelosi reaches deal with progressives to avert showdown over drug price bill Armed Services chair calls defense bill 'most progressive in the history of the country' after criticism MORE (Wis.) and Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — House panel unveils rival fix for surprise medical bills | Democrats punt vote on youth vaping bill | Pelosi drug bill poised for passage after deal with progressives Comey, Schiff to be interviewed by Fox's Chris Wallace Pelosi reaches deal with progressives to avert showdown over drug price bill MORE (Wash.), a Judiciary Committee member. Three vice chairmen who also sit on the Judiciary Committee have come out in favor of an impeachment inquiry: Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Parties clash as impeachment articles move closer to House vote Comey, Schiff to be interviewed by Fox's Chris Wallace MORE (R.I.), Joseph Neguse (Colo.) and Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarFive questions looming over impeachment Rep. Veronica Escobar elected to represent freshman class in House leadership Brindisi, Lamb recommended for Armed Services, Transportation Committees MORE (Texas).

Most Progressive Caucus members represent safely blue districts and constituents more supportive of impeachment.

Progressive freshman Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibHouse passes bill that would give legal status to thousands of undocumented farmworkers Biden narrowly ahead in Iowa as Sanders surges, Warren drops: poll The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — GOP, Democrats square off at final impeachment hearing MORE (Mich.) — who drew attention on her first day in office in January by pledging to “impeach the motherf---er” — introduced a resolution in late March calling for an impeachment inquiry. It now has 12 co-sponsors.

“I think that at this point, it is getting to become so overwhelming that we need to uphold the rule of law and the Constitution of the United States,” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezThe Memo: Pelosi-Trump trade deal provokes debate on left Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez blasts Tucker Carlson as 'white supremacist sympathizer' Julián Castro jabs ICE: 'Delete your account' MORE (D-N.Y.), a Tlaib ally, told reporters this week. “I think that the tide is turning with the public.”

One of the most vocal advocates in the House has been Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenDemocrats reach cusp of impeachment Feehery: Losing faith in the people and the Constitution Warren, Buttigieg fight echoes 2004 campaign, serves as warning for 2020 race MORE (D-Texas), who forced two floor votes on his articles of impeachment in 2017 and 2018.

The articles of impeachment from Green, a CBC member, accused Trump of stoking racial divisions in America.

“At some point we will have to say the word 'impeachment' if we're going to get to impeachment. And I hear people saying that the president should be impeached. So it shouldn't be a difficult thing to say, and hopefully we'll get to it,” Green said.

Just under two-thirds of Green’s CBC colleagues supported his articles of impeachment on the House floor in the last Congress. The bitter feelings toward Trump among black lawmakers began long before the president even took office — when he raised doubts about whether then-President Obama was born in the U.S.

And it’s only gotten worse since Trump engaged in racial controversies such as casting equal blame on white supremacists and counterprotesters for the 2017 violence in Charlottesville, Va., as well as personally attacking multiple members of the CBC.

“Given where the CBC historically has been with respect to this president, we have been the No. 1 company that he rejects. We don't get invited to any meetings,” House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonCongressional investigation finds Coast Guard leadership fell short on handling bullying Judge temporarily halts construction of a private border wall in Texas Hillicon Valley: FCC moves against Huawei, ZTE | Dem groups ask Google to reconsider ads policy | Bill introduced to increase data access during probes MORE (D-Miss.), a CBC member, said on MSNBC’s “Kasie DC.”

Thompson is one of nine Democrats endorsing an impeachment inquiry against Trump who were in office the last time the House voted to impeach a president: Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonParties clash as impeachment articles move closer to House vote USA Today editorial board calls for Trump's impeachment House's proposed impeachment articles are serious grounds to remove the president MORE in 1998.

He’s also one of five House committee chairmen to call for impeaching Trump, a group that includes Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersCalifornia GOP candidate arrested on stalking charges Maxine Waters earns viral praise for steadfast calls for impeachment as articles announced Democrats could introduce articles of impeachment next week MORE (D-Calif.), Budget Committee Chairman John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthOvernight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Kentucky Democrat: McConnell's agenda driven by 'power without a purpose' MORE (D-Ky.), Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.).

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse passes bill that would give legal status to thousands of undocumented farmworkers Collins accusing Democrats of 'tearing down a world leader' GOP calls for minority hearing on impeachment, threatens procedural measures MORE (D-N.Y.), meanwhile, has been privately pushing Democratic leadership to begin an impeachment inquiry, only to be rebuffed. But half of his committee’s members — many of whom are in safe liberal districts — are already on board with the idea.

“My district's been for impeachment for a long time,” said Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenOvernight Defense: Dems unveil impeachment articles against Trump | Saudi military flight students grounded after shooting | Defense bill takes heat from progressives | Pentagon watchdog to probe use of personnel on border Democrats unveil articles of impeachment against Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Dem dilemma on articles of impeachment MORE (D-Tenn.), who chairs a Judiciary subcommittee. “It's hard not to get there.”

California, one of the bluest states in the country, has many pro-impeachment voices.

“I think you can count members from every corner of our caucus,” Rep. Jared HuffmanJared William HuffmanDemocrats reach cusp of impeachment Democrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Pelosi heading to Madrid for UN climate change convention MORE (D-Calif.), who supports impeachment, said in an interview. “You're going to get a lot of Californians simply because we're by far the biggest delegation.”

The group of 11 California Democrats on board with launching an impeachment inquiry now doesn't include Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — GOP, Democrats square off at final impeachment hearing Live coverage: Democrats, Republicans seek to win PR battle in final House impeachment hearing Mnuchin expresses concerns about proposed taxes on financial trades MORE (D-Calif.), who reintroduced articles of impeachment on the first day of the new Congress in January.

Sherman said he thinks Democrats should build more public support first. “Impeachment without removal is not where I want to go,” he said.

Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellLawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Democrats set to open new chapter in impeachment Congress extends flood insurance program for 14th time since 2017 MORE (D-Fla.), who flipped a GOP-held district last fall, is among the Judiciary Committee members who haven’t endorsed an impeachment inquiry. But she indicated that it’s on her mind.

“To tell you the truth, I have been thinking more and more about when it would be appropriate to start the inquiry,” Mucarsel-Powell told CNN’s “New Day” on Friday.

“I've read [special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE's] report. There is clear evidence that this president has obstructed justice, and I think that there have to be serious consequences,” she added.

Another freshman Judiciary Committee member, Rep. Greg StantonGregory (Greg) John StantonWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? WHIP LIST: The 228 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry Arizona Dems ask DHS to appoint 'crisis coordinator' at border MORE (D-Ariz.), won his race by more than 20 points last fall but represents a district that’s been targeted by the GOP in recent years. He’s already on board with an impeachment inquiry.

“I accept that this conclusion will be unpopular with some, but it is the right thing to do,” Stanton said.

And while the nearly 60 House Democrats publicly supportive of impeachment represent only about a quarter of the 235-member caucus, Huffman said he’s heard privately from colleagues who are more are on board than they’re letting on.

“I know the number’s higher,” Huffman said. “But many members don't want to get ahead of leadership. And so that's the delicate process that is underway.”

Mike Lillis contributed to this story.