Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment?

The nearly 60 House Democrats publicly supportive of launching an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP senator introduces bill to hold online platforms liable for political bias Rubio responds to journalist who called it 'strange' to see him at Trump rally Rubio responds to journalist who called it 'strange' to see him at Trump rally MORE represent a microcosm of the caucus, showing how fervor is spreading across diverse factions despite leadership's efforts to contain it.

Most of the members who support an impeachment inquiry are liberal. They include much of the Congressional Progressive Caucus leadership as well as 17 members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), whose members have long been among the most outspoken on impeachment.

Half of the members of the House Judiciary Committee, which would be charged with impeachment proceedings, already support launching an inquiry.

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And while Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi slated to deliver remarks during panel hearing on poverty The DNC's climate problems run deep Cracks form in Democratic dam against impeachment MORE (D-Calif.) is opposed to impeachment, at least 11 of her home-state colleagues have come out in favor of moving forward.

The key constituency most reluctant to push ahead with impeachment are the swing-state members who helped Democrats retake their majority. So far, Rep. Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiCracks form in Democratic dam against impeachment Cracks form in Democratic dam against impeachment California Democrat in swing district calls for Trump impeachment inquiry MORE (N.J.) is the only Democrat who flipped a GOP-held district last fall to back starting an inquiry.

The Hill’s whip list currently lists 58 Democrats in support of an impeachment inquiry. Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashHouse passes amendment to block funding for transgender troops ban House passes amendment to block funding for transgender troops ban House votes against curtailing warrantless collection of Americans' data MORE (Mich.) is the only Republican to say Trump engaged in impeachable conduct.

About two-thirds of the Democrats publicly in favor of starting an impeachment inquiry are members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

They include the two Progressive Caucus co-chairmen, Reps. Mark PocanMark William PocanWarren introduces universal child care legislation Warren introduces universal child care legislation On The Money: DOJ offers legal opinion backing refusal to release Trump tax returns | Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage | Trump bashes Powell ahead of crucial Fed meeting | Design leaks for Harriet Tubman bill MORE (Wis.) and Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalOvernight Health Care: Poll finds most Americans misunderstand scope of 'Medicare for All' | Planned Parenthood chief readies for 2020 | Drugmakers' lawsuit ramps up fight with Trump Overnight Health Care: Poll finds most Americans misunderstand scope of 'Medicare for All' | Planned Parenthood chief readies for 2020 | Drugmakers' lawsuit ramps up fight with Trump Poll finds most Americans misunderstand full scope of 'Medicare for All' MORE (Wash.), a Judiciary Committee member. Three vice chairmen who also sit on the Judiciary Committee have come out in favor of an impeachment inquiry: Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineCracks form in Democratic dam against impeachment Cracks form in Democratic dam against impeachment Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale MORE (R.I.), Joseph Neguse (Colo.) and Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Democrats fail to mollify impeachment crowd MORE (Texas).

Most Progressive Caucus members represent safely blue districts and constituents more supportive of impeachment.

Progressive freshman Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOcasio-Cortez under fire for concentration camp remarks Ocasio-Cortez under fire for concentration camp remarks Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data MORE (Mich.) — who drew attention on her first day in office in January by pledging to “impeach the motherf---er” — introduced a resolution in late March calling for an impeachment inquiry. It now has 12 co-sponsors.

“I think that at this point, it is getting to become so overwhelming that we need to uphold the rule of law and the Constitution of the United States,” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezDem senator: American Jews 'disgusted' by treatment of migrants at border Dem senator: American Jews 'disgusted' by treatment of migrants at border Auschwitz Memorial responds to MSNBC host Chris Hayes over comments on concentration camps MORE (D-N.Y.), a Tlaib ally, told reporters this week. “I think that the tide is turning with the public.”

One of the most vocal advocates in the House has been Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenJulián Castro pledges 0B green infrastructure fund in housing proposal Julián Castro pledges 0B green infrastructure fund in housing proposal We can do right by the planet and the economy MORE (D-Texas), who forced two floor votes on his articles of impeachment in 2017 and 2018.

The articles of impeachment from Green, a CBC member, accused Trump of stoking racial divisions in America.

“At some point we will have to say the word 'impeachment' if we're going to get to impeachment. And I hear people saying that the president should be impeached. So it shouldn't be a difficult thing to say, and hopefully we'll get to it,” Green said.

Just under two-thirds of Green’s CBC colleagues supported his articles of impeachment on the House floor in the last Congress. The bitter feelings toward Trump among black lawmakers began long before the president even took office — when he raised doubts about whether then-President Obama was born in the U.S.

And it’s only gotten worse since Trump engaged in racial controversies such as casting equal blame on white supremacists and counterprotesters for the 2017 violence in Charlottesville, Va., as well as personally attacking multiple members of the CBC.

“Given where the CBC historically has been with respect to this president, we have been the No. 1 company that he rejects. We don't get invited to any meetings,” House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonHillicon Valley: Facebook unveils new cryptocurrency | Waters wants company to halt plans | Democrats look to force votes on election security | Advertisers partner with tech giants on 'digital safety' | House GOP unveils cyber agenda Top Dems question legal basis for appointing Cuccinelli as temporary immigration chief Top Dems question legal basis for appointing Cuccinelli as temporary immigration chief MORE (D-Miss.), a CBC member, said on MSNBC’s “Kasie DC.”

Thompson is one of nine Democrats endorsing an impeachment inquiry against Trump who were in office the last time the House voted to impeach a president: Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBroadway play 'Hillary and Clinton' closing early due to low ticket sales Broadway play 'Hillary and Clinton' closing early due to low ticket sales Campaign dads fit fatherhood between presidential speeches MORE in 1998.

He’s also one of five House committee chairmen to call for impeaching Trump, a group that includes Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersHillicon Valley: Facebook unveils new cryptocurrency | Waters wants company to halt plans | Democrats look to force votes on election security | Advertisers partner with tech giants on 'digital safety' | House GOP unveils cyber agenda On The Money: Trade chief defends Trump tariffs before skeptical Congress | Kudlow denies plan to demote Fed chief | Waters asks Facebook to halt cryptocurrency project On The Money: Trade chief defends Trump tariffs before skeptical Congress | Kudlow denies plan to demote Fed chief | Waters asks Facebook to halt cryptocurrency project MORE (D-Calif.), Budget Committee Chairman John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthPelosi slated to deliver remarks during panel hearing on poverty Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? MORE (D-Ky.), Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.).

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerWant the truth? Put your money on Bill Barr, not Jerry Nadler From abortion to obstruction, politicians' hypocrisy is showing Watergate figure John Dean earns laughter for responses to GOP lawmakers MORE (D-N.Y.), meanwhile, has been privately pushing Democratic leadership to begin an impeachment inquiry, only to be rebuffed. But half of his committee’s members — many of whom are in safe liberal districts — are already on board with the idea.

“My district's been for impeachment for a long time,” said Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenJon Stewart excoriates lawmakers for skipping hearing on 9/11 victim fund Jon Stewart excoriates lawmakers for skipping hearing on 9/11 victim fund Democrats begin Mueller hearings with Watergate-era witness MORE (D-Tenn.), who chairs a Judiciary subcommittee. “It's hard not to get there.”

California, one of the bluest states in the country, has many pro-impeachment voices.

“I think you can count members from every corner of our caucus,” Rep. Jared HuffmanJared William HuffmanDems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Dems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments The Hill's Morning Report - Democrats wonder: Can Nadler handle the Trump probe? MORE (D-Calif.), who supports impeachment, said in an interview. “You're going to get a lot of Californians simply because we're by far the biggest delegation.”

The group of 11 California Democrats on board with launching an impeachment inquiry now doesn't include Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Lawmakers reintroduce bipartisan IRS bill with 'Free File' provision removed MORE (D-Calif.), who reintroduced articles of impeachment on the first day of the new Congress in January.

Sherman said he thinks Democrats should build more public support first. “Impeachment without removal is not where I want to go,” he said.

Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellLawmakers congratulate US women's soccer team on winning opening World Cup match Lawmakers congratulate US women's soccer team on winning opening World Cup match Steyer group targeting 12 congressional Democrats over impeachment MORE (D-Fla.), who flipped a GOP-held district last fall, is among the Judiciary Committee members who haven’t endorsed an impeachment inquiry. But she indicated that it’s on her mind.

“To tell you the truth, I have been thinking more and more about when it would be appropriate to start the inquiry,” Mucarsel-Powell told CNN’s “New Day” on Friday.

“I've read [special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerKamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE's] report. There is clear evidence that this president has obstructed justice, and I think that there have to be serious consequences,” she added.

Another freshman Judiciary Committee member, Rep. Greg StantonGregory (Greg) John StantonWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises MORE (D-Ariz.), won his race by more than 20 points last fall but represents a district that’s been targeted by the GOP in recent years. He’s already on board with an impeachment inquiry.

“I accept that this conclusion will be unpopular with some, but it is the right thing to do,” Stanton said.

And while the nearly 60 House Democrats publicly supportive of impeachment represent only about a quarter of the 235-member caucus, Huffman said he’s heard privately from colleagues who are more are on board than they’re letting on.

“I know the number’s higher,” Huffman said. “But many members don't want to get ahead of leadership. And so that's the delicate process that is underway.”

Mike Lillis contributed to this story.