Who are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment?

The nearly 60 House Democrats publicly supportive of launching an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Trump leaning toward keeping a couple hundred troops in eastern Syria: report Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE represent a microcosm of the caucus, showing how fervor is spreading across diverse factions despite leadership's efforts to contain it.

Most of the members who support an impeachment inquiry are liberal. They include much of the Congressional Progressive Caucus leadership as well as 17 members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), whose members have long been among the most outspoken on impeachment.

Half of the members of the House Judiciary Committee, which would be charged with impeachment proceedings, already support launching an inquiry.

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And while Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTurkey sanctions face possible wall in GOP Senate Trump lashes out at Pelosi as she visits Jordan to discuss Syria Thomas D'Alesandro III, brother of Nancy Pelosi, dies at 90 MORE (D-Calif.) is opposed to impeachment, at least 11 of her home-state colleagues have come out in favor of moving forward.

The key constituency most reluctant to push ahead with impeachment are the swing-state members who helped Democrats retake their majority. So far, Rep. Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiHillicon Valley: GOP lawmakers offer election security measure | FTC Dem worries government is 'captured' by Big Tech | Lawmakers condemn Apple over Hong Kong censorship Lawmakers condemn Apple, Activision Blizzard over censorship of Hong Kong protesters Khashoggi fiancée meets with lawmakers seeking 'justice and accountability' for his slaying MORE (N.J.) is the only Democrat who flipped a GOP-held district last fall to back starting an inquiry.

The Hill’s whip list currently lists 58 Democrats in support of an impeachment inquiry. Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashSunday shows — Mulvaney seeks to tamp down firestorm over quid pro quo comments, Doral decision Amash rips Trump over move to send troops from Syria to Iraq Amash: Clinton's attack on Gabbard will 'drive many people into the arms' of Trump MORE (Mich.) is the only Republican to say Trump engaged in impeachable conduct.

About two-thirds of the Democrats publicly in favor of starting an impeachment inquiry are members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

They include the two Progressive Caucus co-chairmen, Reps. Mark PocanMark William PocanHow Trump and Pelosi went from bad to worse Top progressive calls for Pompeo's salary to be withheld over Sondland's blocked testimony Democrats take Trump impeachment case to voters MORE (Wis.) and Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union —Dem wants more changes to Pelosi drug pricing bill | Ebola outbreak wanes, but funding lags | Johnson & Johnson recalls batch of baby powder after asbestos traces found Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — House Dems advance drug pricing bill | Cases of vaping-related lung illnesses near 1,500 | Juul suspends sales of most e-cigarette flavors Warren faces tougher sell with 'Medicare for All' MORE (Wash.), a Judiciary Committee member. Three vice chairmen who also sit on the Judiciary Committee have come out in favor of an impeachment inquiry: Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHillicon Valley: GOP lawmakers offer election security measure | FTC Dem worries government is 'captured' by Big Tech | Lawmakers condemn Apple over Hong Kong censorship FTC Democrat raises concerns that government is 'captured' by large tech companies Democrats want Mulvaney to testify in Trump impeachment probe MORE (R.I.), Joseph Neguse (Colo.) and Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarLawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings Lawmakers, social media users praise photo of Pelosi confronting Trump Hispanic voters push campaigns to address gun violence MORE (Texas).

Most Progressive Caucus members represent safely blue districts and constituents more supportive of impeachment.

Progressive freshman Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOcasio-Cortez says endorsing Sanders early is 'the most authentic decision' she could make Ocasio-Cortez: Sanders' heart attack was a 'gut check' moment Ocasio-Cortez tweets endorsement of Sanders MORE (Mich.) — who drew attention on her first day in office in January by pledging to “impeach the motherf---er” — introduced a resolution in late March calling for an impeachment inquiry. It now has 12 co-sponsors.

“I think that at this point, it is getting to become so overwhelming that we need to uphold the rule of law and the Constitution of the United States,” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez says endorsing Sanders early is 'the most authentic decision' she could make Ocasio-Cortez: Sanders' heart attack was a 'gut check' moment Ocasio-Cortez tweets endorsement of Sanders MORE (D-N.Y.), a Tlaib ally, told reporters this week. “I think that the tide is turning with the public.”

One of the most vocal advocates in the House has been Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenTrump criticizes Clinton for suggesting Jill Stein was Russian asset Climate finance must push net-zero emissions Trump impeachment efforts will haunt the next Democrat in the White House MORE (D-Texas), who forced two floor votes on his articles of impeachment in 2017 and 2018.

The articles of impeachment from Green, a CBC member, accused Trump of stoking racial divisions in America.

“At some point we will have to say the word 'impeachment' if we're going to get to impeachment. And I hear people saying that the president should be impeached. So it shouldn't be a difficult thing to say, and hopefully we'll get to it,” Green said.

Just under two-thirds of Green’s CBC colleagues supported his articles of impeachment on the House floor in the last Congress. The bitter feelings toward Trump among black lawmakers began long before the president even took office — when he raised doubts about whether then-President Obama was born in the U.S.

And it’s only gotten worse since Trump engaged in racial controversies such as casting equal blame on white supremacists and counterprotesters for the 2017 violence in Charlottesville, Va., as well as personally attacking multiple members of the CBC.

“Given where the CBC historically has been with respect to this president, we have been the No. 1 company that he rejects. We don't get invited to any meetings,” House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonUS ban on China tech giant faces uncertainty a month out Democrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Hillicon Valley: Democrats seize on whistleblower complaint to push for election security | Google taps GOP Senate aide to lead lobbying | Warren calls for congressional tech office MORE (D-Miss.), a CBC member, said on MSNBC’s “Kasie DC.”

Thompson is one of nine Democrats endorsing an impeachment inquiry against Trump who were in office the last time the House voted to impeach a president: Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonHouse Democrat pledges 'there will be open hearings' in impeachment inquiry Democrats dig in ahead of Supreme Court ruling on 'Dreamers' Even with likely Trump impeachment, Democrats face uphill climb to win presidency MORE in 1998.

He’s also one of five House committee chairmen to call for impeaching Trump, a group that includes Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Hillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets On The Money: Tax, loan documents for Trump properties reportedly showed inconsistencies | Tensions flare as Dems hammer Trump consumer chief | Critics pounce as Facebook crypto project stumbles MORE (D-Calif.), Budget Committee Chairman John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthHow Trump and Pelosi went from bad to worse On The Money: Trump signs stopgap spending bill | Shutdown fight delayed to November | Deutsche Bank reveals it has two individual tax returns tied to House subpoena | House Dems demand documents on Ukraine aid It's time to axe the unjust 'widow's tax' MORE (D-Ky.), Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.).

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerDem committee chairs blast Trump G-7 announcement Top Democrat holds moment of silence for Cummings at hearing Barr to speak at Notre Dame law school on Friday MORE (D-N.Y.), meanwhile, has been privately pushing Democratic leadership to begin an impeachment inquiry, only to be rebuffed. But half of his committee’s members — many of whom are in safe liberal districts — are already on board with the idea.

“My district's been for impeachment for a long time,” said Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenDemocrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Hill editor-in-chief: 'Hard to imagine' House leadership without Cummings Top Democrat holds moment of silence for Cummings at hearing MORE (D-Tenn.), who chairs a Judiciary subcommittee. “It's hard not to get there.”

California, one of the bluest states in the country, has many pro-impeachment voices.

“I think you can count members from every corner of our caucus,” Rep. Jared HuffmanJared William HuffmanScrap House defense authorization provision benefitting Russia Democrat argues GOP had 'no deep love or loyalty' to Trump Democrats take Trump impeachment case to voters MORE (D-Calif.), who supports impeachment, said in an interview. “You're going to get a lot of Californians simply because we're by far the biggest delegation.”

The group of 11 California Democrats on board with launching an impeachment inquiry now doesn't include Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanCongress must push for a 'Gold Standard' nuclear agreement with Saudi Arabia Critics pounce as Facebook crypto project stumbles This week: Congress returns to chaotic Washington MORE (D-Calif.), who reintroduced articles of impeachment on the first day of the new Congress in January.

Sherman said he thinks Democrats should build more public support first. “Impeachment without removal is not where I want to go,” he said.

Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellProgressive Latino group launches first incumbent protection campaign Hispanic Democrats announce 'Latina Prosperity Principles' Gun epidemic is personal for lawmakers touched by violence MORE (D-Fla.), who flipped a GOP-held district last fall, is among the Judiciary Committee members who haven’t endorsed an impeachment inquiry. But she indicated that it’s on her mind.

“To tell you the truth, I have been thinking more and more about when it would be appropriate to start the inquiry,” Mucarsel-Powell told CNN’s “New Day” on Friday.

“I've read [special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE's] report. There is clear evidence that this president has obstructed justice, and I think that there have to be serious consequences,” she added.

Another freshman Judiciary Committee member, Rep. Greg StantonGregory (Greg) John StantonWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? WHIP LIST: The 228 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry Arizona Dems ask DHS to appoint 'crisis coordinator' at border MORE (D-Ariz.), won his race by more than 20 points last fall but represents a district that’s been targeted by the GOP in recent years. He’s already on board with an impeachment inquiry.

“I accept that this conclusion will be unpopular with some, but it is the right thing to do,” Stanton said.

And while the nearly 60 House Democrats publicly supportive of impeachment represent only about a quarter of the 235-member caucus, Huffman said he’s heard privately from colleagues who are more are on board than they’re letting on.

“I know the number’s higher,” Huffman said. “But many members don't want to get ahead of leadership. And so that's the delicate process that is underway.”

Mike Lillis contributed to this story.