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Trump judicial nominee withdraws amid Republican opposition: report

Trump judicial nominee withdraws amid Republican opposition: report
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Michael Bogren, whom President TrumpDonald John TrumpAppeals court OKs White House diverting military funding to border wall construction Pentagon: Tentative meeting between spy agencies, Biden transition set for early next week Conservative policy director calls Section 230 repeal an 'existential threat' for tech MORE nominated to the district court for the Western District of Michigan, will withdraw his name from consideration, three sources familiar with the matter told Politico.

Bogren faced an unexpected level of opposition from Republican senators, including Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP senators back Christian school's push for COVID-19 carve-out Senate committee approves nominations of three FEC commissioners Cruz urges Supreme Court to take up Pennsylvania election challenge MORE (Texas), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisRep. Mark Walker announces Senate bid in North Carolina Grassley returns to Capitol after having coronavirus McConnell halts in-person Republican lunches amid COVID-19 surge MORE (N.C.) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyGOP senators back Christian school's push for COVID-19 carve-out Trump doubles down on Section 230 repeal after GOP pushback Senate committee approves nominations of three FEC commissioners MORE (Mo.), all of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Committee. He also was criticized by a slew of conservative advocacy groups including the Judicial Crisis Network, Heritage Action for America and Conservative Action Project.

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The withdrawal is a setback for the administration, which has put a premium on pushing its judicial nominees through the Senate.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.

The source of Republicans’ concerns over Bogren was a brief he signed off on while defending the City of East Lansing against a Catholic couple who opposed same-sex marriage. The couple sued the city after they were barred from a farmers market after they refused to a host a same-sex marriage on their farm.

The city’s brief defended its position in part by comparing the situation to the Knights of the White Camelia, the Ku Klux Klan and imams who oppose giving women the right to drive. The analogies offended several Republicans.

Bogren is a managing partner at Plunkett Cooney.