Trump asserts executive privilege over subpoenaed census docs

President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham to introduce resolution condemning House impeachment inquiry Support for impeachment inches up in poll Fox News's Bret Baier calls Trump's attacks on media 'a problem' MORE has asserted executive privilege over congressionally subpoenaed documents on the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census, the Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

The announcement comes as the House Oversight and Reform Committee is set to vote on whether to hold Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrBrennan's CIA a subject of Barr's review of Russia investigation: report Pelosi releases 'fact sheet' saying Trump has 'betrayed his oath of office' Federal prosecutors interviewed multiple FBI officials for Russia probe review: report MORE and Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossPompeo expected to visit Kansas on Thursday US ban on China tech giant faces uncertainty a month out US imposes new sanctions on Cuba over human rights, Venezuela MORE in contempt for failing to comply with congressional subpoenas for the documents.

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"By proceeding with today's vote, you have abandoned the accommodation process with respect to your requests and subpoenas for documents concerning the secretary's decision to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census," Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd wrote in a letter to House Oversight and Reform Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsBlack lawmakers condemn Trump's 'lynching' remarks The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Better Medicare Alliance - Trump's impeachment plea to Republicans Diplomat who raised Ukraine concerns to testify in Trump impeachment probe MORE (D-Md.).

"The executive branch has engaged in good-faith efforts to satisfy the legislative needs of the committee. Moreover, until the committee's abrupt decision to seek a contempt resolution, the department was prepared to provide a significant number of additional documents responsive to the committee's April 2, 2019 subpoena." 

"Unfortunately, rather than allowing the department to complete its document production, you have chosen to go forward with an unnecessary and premature contempt vote."

Boyd wrote that Trump has asserted executive privilege over some of the subpoenaed documents, including drafts of a letter sent from the Justice Department to Commerce Department officials requesting that the citizenship question be added to the 2020 census.

Cummings blasted the administration over the assertion, saying that he has been asking for the documents at hand for more than a year and questioning why the departments didn't send their letters until moments before the vote was scheduled to be held.

"This does not appear to be an effort to engage in good faith negotiations or accommodations," he said.

The chairman said that he would delay the contempt vote until this afternoon to allow members to review the letters on executive privilege.

The announcement came one day after Boyd sent a separate letter to Cummings, warning that executive privilege would be invoked if the House panel moved forward with the contempt votes for Barr and Ross. The Justice Department official also asked Cummings to delay the vote as Trump weighs whether the documents fall under the scope of executive privilege.

"As I indicated in my letter to you yesterday, this protective assertion ensures the president's ability to make a final decision whether to assert privilege following a full review of these materials," Boyd wrote Wednesday.

The Commerce Department on Wednesday also sent Cummings a letter notifying him that Trump has asserted executive privilege over some of the documents subpoenaed from that agency.

"The department regrets that you have made this assertion necessary by your insistence upon scheduling a premature contempt vote," wrote Charles Rathburn, the acting assistant secretary for legislative and intergovernmental affairs at the Commerce Department.

In a letter sent Tuesday night, Cummings offered to delay the contempt vote if the two agencies handed over unredacted copies of certain documents requested by the lawmakers.

Boyd wrote in the letter Wednesday that the "department has explained to the committee on several occasions that these identified documents consist of attorney-client communications, attorney work product, and deliberative communications, and a federal court has already held many of these documents to be privileged in litigation."

Wednesday's move is the latest effort by the White House to assert executive privilege over documents sought by Democrats investigating Trump and his administration.

Updated at 10:53 a.m.