SPONSORED:

Trump: 'Totally ridiculous' to have census without citizenship question

President TrumpDonald TrumpFreedom Caucus member condemns GOP group pushing 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell's new free speech site to ban certain curse words Secret Facebook groups of special operations officers include racist comments, QAnon posts: report MORE on Wednesday defended his administration’s controversial decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

“I think it’s totally ridiculous that we would have a census without asking,” Trump said during an Oval Office meeting with the president of Poland.

His remarks came the same day the Justice Department announced that Trump had invoked executive privilege to block congressional investigators from viewing documents related to the administration's move to add the citizenship question.

ADVERTISEMENT

The decision to invoke privilege escalated the fight between the White House and the Democratic-controlled House.

The Oversight and Reform Committee is set to vote Wednesday afternoon on whether to hold Attorney General William BarrBill BarrGarland rescinds Trump-era memo curtailing consent decrees Boehner: Trump 'stepped all over their loyalty' by lying to followers Dominion: Ex-Michigan state senator 'sowing discord in our democracy' with election fraud claims MORE and Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossFormer Trump officials find tough job market On The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits MORE in contempt for failing to comply with congressional subpoenas for documents related to their census investigation.

Critics in Congress argue that adding a citizenship question could intimidate immigrants from participating and create an inaccurate population count. That could have major consequences when congressional district lines are redrawn, with opponents arguing it could benefit Republicans.

The administration has dismissed that argument, saying the question is intended to provide accurate information about the U.S. population.

A citizenship question has not been included in census questions for all U.S. households since 1950.