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McCabe says it's 'absolutely' time to launch impeachment inquiry into Trump

Former Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeThe FBI should turn off the FARA faucet John Durham's endgame: Don't expect criminal charges Carter Page sues over surveillance related to Russia probe MORE said Thursday that it was "absolutely" time to launch an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald TrumpHead of firms that pushed 'Italygate' theory falsely claimed VA mansion was her home: report Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting VA moving to cover gender affirmation surgery through department health care MORE.

CNN's Chris CuomoChris CuomoCNN insults #MeToo movement, provides happy ending for Jeffrey Toobin Club for Growth bashes CNN in social media ad The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Citizens' Climate Lobby - Biden, Capito meet today as deadline looms MORE asked McCabe, "Do you believe that an impeachment inquiry is warranted based on what you understand and what has come out of the Mueller report?"

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"Absolutely," McCabe responded, pointing to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE's investigation, which found insufficient evidence to charge Trump with conspiring with Moscow to interfere in the election, but did not exonerate him with regards to obstruction of justice.

"I think we are clearly there with the results of the special counsel team," McCabe said. "There are so many witnesses who could provide important, essential testimony to Congress that can only be done in the scope of an impeachment inquiry."

"Action should be taken immediately," he continued, and it is "beside the point" whether the inquiry results in articles of impeachment.

McCabe was fired from the FBI last year after an internal report found he was not forthcoming with investigators.

He responded that his dismissal was part of a larger effort by the administration to discredit the FBI and the special counsel's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Mueller's report detailed numerous contacts that Trump associates and campaign members had with Russian figures during the 2016 race.

The special counsel declined to make a prosecutorial decision about whether the president obstructed subsequent investigations into the interference, but outlined 10 “episodes” of behavior that his team investigated for possible obstruction of justice.

Several Democrats, and Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashAmash warns of turning lawmakers like Cheney into 'heroes' Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP Biden: 'Prince Philip gladly dedicated himself to the people of the UK' MORE (R-Mich.), have called for proceedings to be initiated based on those results.

Democratic leadership has urged patience, saying the House should focus on its other investigations into the Trump administration, and on passing legislation.