McCabe says it's 'absolutely' time to launch impeachment inquiry into Trump

Former Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeFBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book Senate GOP set to ramp up Obama-era probes Showtime miniseries to feature Jeff Daniels as Comey, Brendan Gleeson as Trump MORE said Thursday that it was "absolutely" time to launch an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpUPS, FedEx shut down calls to handle mail-in ballots, warn of 'significant' problems: report Controversial GOP Georgia candidate attempts to distance from QAnon Trump orders TikTok parent company to sell US assets within 90 days MORE.

CNN's Chris CuomoChris CuomoCouncil revokes license of New Jersey gym whose owners defied coronavirus order Defiant NJ gym owners to CNN's Cuomo: 'We're being villainized' Chris Cuomo blasts Trump over photo with Goya products: 'In the middle of a pandemic, they're selling beans' MORE asked McCabe, "Do you believe that an impeachment inquiry is warranted based on what you understand and what has come out of the Mueller report?"

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"Absolutely," McCabe responded, pointing to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's investigation, which found insufficient evidence to charge Trump with conspiring with Moscow to interfere in the election, but did not exonerate him with regards to obstruction of justice.

"I think we are clearly there with the results of the special counsel team," McCabe said. "There are so many witnesses who could provide important, essential testimony to Congress that can only be done in the scope of an impeachment inquiry."

"Action should be taken immediately," he continued, and it is "beside the point" whether the inquiry results in articles of impeachment.

McCabe was fired from the FBI last year after an internal report found he was not forthcoming with investigators.

He responded that his dismissal was part of a larger effort by the administration to discredit the FBI and the special counsel's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Mueller's report detailed numerous contacts that Trump associates and campaign members had with Russian figures during the 2016 race.

The special counsel declined to make a prosecutorial decision about whether the president obstructed subsequent investigations into the interference, but outlined 10 “episodes” of behavior that his team investigated for possible obstruction of justice.

Several Democrats, and Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashKudlow acknowledges executive orders may end up in court: 'We're going to go ahead with our actions anyways' Several GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders Peter Meijer wins GOP primary in Amash's Michigan district MORE (R-Mich.), have called for proceedings to be initiated based on those results.

Democratic leadership has urged patience, saying the House should focus on its other investigations into the Trump administration, and on passing legislation.