McCabe says it's 'absolutely' time to launch impeachment inquiry into Trump

Former Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeMcCabe says he would 'absolutely not' cut a deal with prosecutors We've lost sight of the real scandal Former Obama officials willing to testify on McCabe's behalf: report MORE said Thursday that it was "absolutely" time to launch an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump conversation with foreign leader part of complaint that led to standoff between intel chief, Congress: report Pelosi: Lewandowski should have been held in contempt 'right then and there' Trump to withdraw FEMA chief nominee: report MORE.

CNN's Chris CuomoChristopher (Chris) Charles CuomoSuper PAC head spars with CNN's Cuomo over Ocasio-Cortez ad Nadler: Impeachment inquiry a 'made-up term' but it's essentially 'what we are doing' CNN climate town hall finishes last in viewers among cable news broadcasts MORE asked McCabe, "Do you believe that an impeachment inquiry is warranted based on what you understand and what has come out of the Mueller report?"

ADVERTISEMENT

"Absolutely," McCabe responded, pointing to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerLewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network Mueller report fades from political conversation MORE's investigation, which found insufficient evidence to charge Trump with conspiring with Moscow to interfere in the election, but did not exonerate him with regards to obstruction of justice.

"I think we are clearly there with the results of the special counsel team," McCabe said. "There are so many witnesses who could provide important, essential testimony to Congress that can only be done in the scope of an impeachment inquiry."

"Action should be taken immediately," he continued, and it is "beside the point" whether the inquiry results in articles of impeachment.

McCabe was fired from the FBI last year after an internal report found he was not forthcoming with investigators.

He responded that his dismissal was part of a larger effort by the administration to discredit the FBI and the special counsel's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Mueller's report detailed numerous contacts that Trump associates and campaign members had with Russian figures during the 2016 race.

The special counsel declined to make a prosecutorial decision about whether the president obstructed subsequent investigations into the interference, but outlined 10 “episodes” of behavior that his team investigated for possible obstruction of justice.

Several Democrats, and Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashTrump's 'soldier of fortune' foreign policy Amash: 'Bolton never should have been hired' Romney: Bolton firing 'a huge loss' for nation MORE (R-Mich.), have called for proceedings to be initiated based on those results.

Democratic leadership has urged patience, saying the House should focus on its other investigations into the Trump administration, and on passing legislation.