Trump steadfast in denials as support for impeachment grows

President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Camerota clashes with Trump's immigration head over president's tweet LA Times editorial board labels Trump 'Bigot-in-Chief' Trump complains of 'fake polls' after surveys show him trailing multiple Democratic candidates MORE in an interview broadcast Sunday repeatedly said special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE found no collusion with Russia and "essentially" ruled out obstruction, coming back to the point in response to a number of questions at the same time a new poll showed that the number of Americans who support impeachment is growing.

In the ABC News interview, Trump said he read Mueller’s report, released in April, and that the special counsel “found no collusion, and he didn’t find anything having to do with obstruction.”

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The report cited more than 100 contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia but said there was insufficient evidence to conclude there was a conspiracy. Investigators also did not make a determination on whether Trump obstructed justice, with Mueller saying it was because a sitting president cannot be prosecuted.

In the same interview, Trump waved off a letter in which more than 1,000 federal prosecutors said he would have been indicted for obstruction were he not a sitting president, saying the signatories were “politicians” and “Trump haters.”

His interview was broadcast as a poll from NBC News and The Wall Street Journal found that support for impeachment hearings had increased 10 points since May, to 27 percent. The increase was largely driven by Democrats, 48 percent of whom now favor impeachment, up 18 points from last month. 

The new poll found that the number of Americans who believe Congress should continue to investigate whether there is sufficient evidence to hold impeachment hearings fell 8 points to 24 percent.

A Fox News poll released Sunday, meanwhile, found that that 50 percent of respondents said they believe the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia, up 6 points from March. Forty-four percent of respondents said they don't believe there was collusion.

Half of that poll’s respondents favored impeachment, with 43 percent supporting impeaching and removing Trump — a 1-point increase from March — and 7 percent endorsing impeachment but not removal, compared to 48 percent who opposed impeachment. The same survey found that 56 percent of respondents said it was “not at all” likely that Trump will eventually be impeached.

The surveys come amid increasing chagrin from the progressive wing of the Democratic Party over Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiNYT's Friedman repeatedly says 's---hole' in tirade against Trump on CNN GOP lawmaker: Trump's tweets 'obviously not racist' On the USMCA, Pelosi can't take yes for an answer MORE’s (D-Calif.) hard line against impeachment proceedings.

In an interview on ABC’s "This Week," Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHillary Clinton responds to Trump tweets telling Dem lawmakers to 'go back' to their countries Trump doubles down after telling Democratic congresswomen to 'go back' to their countries #RacistInChief takes off on Twitter after Trump tells Dems to go back where they 'came from' MORE (D-N.Y.) said that frustration with Pelosi’s stance is "quite real."

"I think for me this question should not be about polls, it should not be about elections. I think that impeachment is incredibly serious and this is about the presence and evidence that the president may have committed a crime, in this case more than one," Ocasio-Cortez said.

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) also spoke out against the failure to initiate impeachment proceedings in an interview that aired Sunday.

"Impeachment is incredibly important to get to the facts, to discover the truth, to make sure that there is accountability for the undermining of our democracy but also to send the signal that this can never happen again, to send the signal to Russia, to send the signal to Donald Trump, to send the signal to this country that we will save this democracy," he said on CNN’s "State of the Union."

In a press conference Thursday, Pelosi said that Trump’s comments lacked any “ethical sense” but reaffirmed her opposition to impeachment, saying she would not be swayed based on “any one issue,” instead using “a methodical approach to the path that we are on, and this will be included in that.”

“It’s about investigating. It’s about litigating. It’s about getting the truth,” she said.

Other members of the crowded Democratic presidential field who called for impeachment before Trump’s campaign interference remarks doubled down after he made the comments last week.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump complains of 'fake polls' after surveys show him trailing multiple Democratic candidates Amazon warehouse workers strike on Prime Day Elizabeth Warren backs Amazon workers striking on Prime Day MORE (D-Mass.) tweeted Wednesday night, “A foreign government attacked our 2016 elections to support Trump, Trump welcomed that help, and Trump obstructed the investigation. Now, he said he'd do it all over again. It's time to impeach Donald Trump.” 

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - Trump attack on progressive Dems draws sharp rebuke 2020 Democrats upend digital campaign playbook Gillibrand speaks of how she benefits from white privilege MORE (D-N.Y.), meanwhile, tweeted, “It’s time for Congress to begin impeachment hearings.”