SPONSORED:

Trump confirms he authorized Rand Paul to negotiate with Iran

President TrumpDonald TrumpClinton, Bush, Obama reflect on peaceful transition of power on Biden's Inauguration Day Arizona Republican's brothers say he is 'at least partially to blame' for Capitol violence Biden reverses Trump's freeze on .4 billion in funds MORE on Friday confirmed he has authorized Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate confirms Biden's intel chief, giving him first Cabinet official McConnell faces conservative backlash over Trump criticism McConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time MORE (R-Ky.) to negotiate with Iran over reducing tensions, reversing himself a day after he denied reports he permitted Paul to serve as an emissary to Tehran. 

“Rand is a friend of mine, and Rand asked me if he could get involved. The answer is yes, and if the other senators ask me to get involved, I’d probably say yes depending on who they were,” Trump told reporters at the White House Friday. “I have many people involved, and Iran is going to work out very nicely. “

ADVERTISEMENT

On Thursday, Trump told reporters he had not signed off on Paul’s request to help reduce tensions with Iran.

“I would listen to him, but I didn’t appoint him, no,” he said. “No, he’s somebody I listen to, and I respect Sen. Paul, and if he had some ideas I would listen.” 

Politico first reported Wednesday that Paul, a staunch isolationist, proposed meeting with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif to try to restart negotiations on the White House’s behalf and that Trump approved.

Paul has clashed with some of the president’s more hawkish advisers, including national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonPence, other GOP officials expected to skip Trump send-off NSA places former GOP political operative in top lawyer position after Pentagon chief's reported order After insurrection: The national security implications MORE and Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoBiden taps career civil servants to acting posts at State, USAID, UN China sanctions Pompeo and more than two dozen US figures China calls Pompeo 'doomsday clown' after its treatment of Uighurs labeled genocide MORE, and is an outspoken critic of U.S. military interventions in foreign countries. Earlier this year he stressed that the Trump administration must seek approval from Congress if it seeks to go to war with Iran. 

Tensions between Washington and Tehran have skyrocketed in recent weeks as Iran exceeded the limits placed on its uranium enrichment by an Obama-era nuclear pact. Trump withdrew the U.S. from the deal last year, but international observers confirmed that Tehran had stayed within the agreement’s bounds until recently.

Trump since withdrawing from the deal has slapped stringent sanctions on Iran's oil industry, metals sector, Revolutionary Guard Corps and supreme leader, which he says have crippled the country’s economy.

“Iran is showing their colors. Going to work out very nicely. Iran is in big trouble right now,” Trump said Friday. “A lot of bad things are happening to them. It’s very easy to straighten out, or it’s very easy for us to make it a lot worse.”

Trump has insisted the administration remains open to negotiating with Iran over its nuclear ambitions and support for armed groups in the region.