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Key numbers to know for Mueller's testimony

Former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE will soon retake the national spotlight as he testifies publicly before Congress about his investigation into Russian interference during the 2016 election.

Mueller, who remained quiet throughout his investigation, will be grilled by members of the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees on Wednesday about the findings laid out in his lengthy report.

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Given Mueller’s insistence that he will speak only about matters within the four corners of his report, Democrats are expected to focus heavily on the details in his document including the contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia and the evidence of potential obstruction of justice Mueller lays out. 

Here are some key statistics from Mueller’s report as Washington braces for his public testimony:

2: Mueller’s report is broken into two volumes: the first details Russia’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, while the second provides an exhaustive account of possible episodes of obstruction of justice by President TrumpDonald TrumpVeteran accused in alleged border wall scheme faces new charges Arizona Republicans to brush off DOJ concern about election audit FEC drops investigation into Trump hush money payments MORE as examined by the special counsel.

4: Attorney General William BarrBill BarrThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Facebook upholds Trump ban; GOP leaders back Stefanik to replace Cheney Judge's decision on Barr memo puts spotlight on secretive DOJ office Trump allies launching nonprofit focused on voter fraud MORE restricted four categories of information from the public version of Mueller’s report, including grand jury material, sensitive intelligence information, details of ongoing investigations and information that could infringe on the privacy of “peripheral third parties.” 

6: The special counsel charged six Trump associates in the course of his investigation with false statements, financial crimes and other offenses. All of them eventually entered guilty pleas save for longtime Trump confidant Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneCohen on Giuliani: 'Chickens coming home to roost' There was Trump-Russia collusion — and Trump pardoned the colluder On The Money: Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats | Justice Dept. sues Trump ally Roger Stone for unpaid taxes MORE, who will go to trial in November.  

7: Mueller obtained seven guilty pleas during the course of his investigation, including from key figures such as former Trump lawyer Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenFEC drops investigation into Trump hush money payments DOJ asks for outside lawyer to review Giuliani evidence Former New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver released from prison: report MORE, former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and former Trump campaign officials Richard Gates and Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortThere was Trump-Russia collusion — and Trump pardoned the colluder Treasury: Manafort associate passed 'sensitive' campaign data to Russian intelligence Hunter Biden blasts Trump in new book: 'A vile man with a vile mission' MORE. The list also includes some fringe figures, such as Richard Pinedo, a California man who admitted to committing identity fraud in connection with the Russian troll farm case. 

9: Mueller’s first and only public remarks about his investigation’s findings in late May lasted roughly nine minutes.  

11: Mueller examined 11 episodes in which Trump may have obstructed the FBI’s original investigation into Russian interference or the special counsel’s investigation itself. One episode that has attracted particular scrutiny was the president’s attempts to have then-White House counsel Don McGahn remove Mueller as special counsel.

13: Mueller made 13 requests to foreign governments under mutual legal assistance treaties, deals in which two countries agree to share evidence and relevant information tied to criminal and other related matters. 

14: Mueller uncovered other possible criminal activity outside the scope of his original mandate and referred 14 such instances to other Justice Department offices for investigation. Two of those are known — the investigations that spurred charges against former Trump attorney Michael Cohen and former Obama-era White House counsel Greg Craig — but the rest remain redacted in the public report. 

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19: Mueller assembled a team that included 19 prosecutors at the high point of his investigation. Five of the prosecutors, including Mueller, joined the special counsel’s office from the private sector and 14 were on detail from the Justice Department.

22: Mueller began his Russia investigation in spring 2017 after Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinProtect the police or the First Amendment? Rosenstein: Zero tolerance immigration policy 'never should have been proposed or implemented' Comey argues Trump shouldn't be prosecuted after leaving Oval Office MORE appointed him special counsel on May 17 and shortly following Trump’s decision to fire James ComeyJames Brien Comey'Fox News Sunday' to mark 25 years on air Showtime developing limited series about Jan. 6 Capitol riot Wray says FBI not systemically racist MORE as FBI director. Mueller submitted his final report to Barr about 22 months later, on March 22. 

37: Mueller charged 37 individuals and entities throughout his investigation, including 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities for their role in powering a St. Petersburg troll farm that spread disinformation and 12 Russian intelligence officers for conducting cyberattacks against Democrats and electoral infrastructure.

40: The FBI assigned 40 officials to work alongside Mueller’s investigators, a group that included agents, intelligence analysts, forensic accountants, a paralegal and other professional staff. 

48: Mueller’s investigation examined at least 48 contacts between Trump campaign officials, advisers or associates and individuals linked to the Kremlin or otherwise connected to Russia's interference effort. 

50: The special counsel’s office obtained nearly 50 orders authorizing the use of pen registers, devices that record the phone numbers called from a particular phone line. 

230: The investigators obtained more than 230 communications records orders through a federal statute. 

448: Mueller’s lengthy report spans 448 pages, including two nearly 200-page volumes and a number of appendices. 

500: The investigative team interviewed approximately 500 witnesses as part of its investigation, of which 80 witnesses testified before the grand jury. The special counsel’s office also conducted nearly 500 search-and-seizure warrants.

2,800: Mueller’s grand jury in Washington, D.C., issued over 2,800 subpoenas. 

25 million: The final total cost of Mueller’s investigation remains unknown, but its expenditures totaled just over $25 million through September of last year.