Giuliani: Mueller should not testify before Congress

Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiOusted Manhattan US Attorney Berman to testify before House next week Sunday shows preview: With coronavirus cases surging, lawmakers and health officials weigh in Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down MORE, a personal attorney for President TrumpDonald John TrumpProtesters tear down statue of Christopher Columbus in Baltimore 'Independence Day' star Bill Pullman urges Americans to wear a 'freedom mask' in July 4 PSA Protesters burn American flag outside White House after Trump's July Fourth address MORE, said former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE should not testify before Congress ahead of speaking to two House committees Wednesday.

“He shouldn’t really [testify]. He already put out his report. He made his 10-minute statement and then said he wasn’t going to talk about it anymore because it’s not proper,” Giuliani said Sunday on John Catsimatidis’s radio show, referring to a press conference Mueller gave on his report that he said would be his final word on his two-year probe.

ADVERTISEMENT

“But somebody must’ve persuaded him that he should comment some more. He’s already commented more than any prosecutor has ever commented about a case he didn’t bring. Let’s see what he says,” Giuliani added.

Mueller is slated to appear Wednesday before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees to testify about his two-year probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice into subsequent investigations.

The former special counsel found insufficient evidence to bring charges against Trump or his closest associates over conspiring with Moscow in 2016 but declined to clear the president of any wrongdoing over allegations of obstruction of justice, outlining 10 “episodes” of possibly obstructive behavior.

But Mueller said he could not bring charges, citing existing Justice Department guidelines against indicting a sitting president. 

Mueller has affirmed he will not go beyond the four corners of his report, though Democrats are eager for the opportunity for a national television audience to hear some of its more embarrassing details for the White House.

“People think in narratives,” Rep. Madeleine DeanMadeleine DeanBehind every gun law is a mom marching for her children Democrats rally behind monthly ,000 relief checks Bloomberg builds momentum on Capitol Hill with new endorsements MORE (D-Pa.), a member of the Judiciary panel, told The Hill this week. “There is an incredibly damning set of narratives in this report and so that’s what we need Mr. Mueller to show.”

Giuliani, however, said Republicans will also take the opportunity to ask questions of Mueller casting his probe as an attempt to oust Trump.

“I think that Mueller is going to find out that, although he can’t talk about the investigation anymore than he has already disclosed, he’s going to be faced with a lot of questions he hasn’t answered before,” he said. “I’m quite convinced it was definitely an attempt to, first, stop Donald Trump from being president and then to remove him from office. There’s no doubt that was the motivation.”