Trump renews Mueller attacks days before testimony

President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive landmark moments of testimony to Congress Lindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight Democrats sharpen their message on impeachment MORE on Monday renewed his attacks on Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSpeier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump Gowdy: I '100 percent' still believe public congressional hearings are 'a circus' Comey: Mueller 'didn't succeed in his mission because there was inadequate transparency' MORE, days before the former special counsel is set to testify about the Russia investigation during a highly anticipated congressional hearing.

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In a pair of tweets, Trump repeated his claim that Mueller is “highly conflicted” and accused him of leading a “ridiculous Witch Hunt.” The president for more than two years has leveled both charges in an attempt to undermine Mueller’s credibility.

“Highly conflicted Robert Mueller should not be given another bite at the apple. In the end it will be bad for him and the phony Democrats in Congress who have done nothing but waste time on this ridiculous Witch Hunt,” Trump tweeted.

The president also repeated his belief that Mueller’s report found “NO COLLUSION, NO OBSTRUCTION!”

Mueller on Wednesday is scheduled to testify before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees, marking the first time he will answer questions about the probe into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction by Trump. 

His appearance on Capitol Hill will create a televised spectacle, with cable and broadcast networks preparing special coverage of the hearings. It could also breathe new life into the debate among congressional Democrats whether to impeach Trump. 

Trump has responded by attempting to deflect questions about his own actions, saying Monday that Mueller should be asked about alleged wrongdoing by 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonFive landmark moments of testimony to Congress Top diplomat said request for specific probes in Ukraine was 'contrary' to US policy Feehery: What Republicans must do to adapt to political realignment MORE and former FBI officials Peter Strzok and Lisa Page. 

Mueller is expected to face questions about his decision not to recommend obstruction charges against Trump. During his first public comments on the investigation, Mueller said he could not clear Trump on obstruction of justice and suggested the decision was in part due to Justice Department guidelines stating that a sitting president cannot be indicted.