White House calls trade talks with China 'constructive'

White House calls trade talks with China 'constructive'
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The White House on Wednesday called talks between the U.S. and China “constructive” and said the two sides will meet again in early September to discuss a resolution to the countries’ months-long trade war. 

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White House press secretary Stephanie GrishamStephanie GrishamFewer Americans following impeachment inquiry, poll shows Appeals court hands Trump partial win over 'public charge' rule for immigrants Trump blasts Pelosi's impeachment announcement MORE said the Chinese government “confirmed their commitment to increase purchases of United States agricultural exports” and that top officials talked about major flashpoints in the trading relationship, including forced technology transfers, intellectual property rights and nontariff barriers.  

U.S. Trade Representative Robert LighthizerRobert (Bob) Emmet LighthizerPelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 Pelosi sounds hopeful on new NAFTA deal despite tensions with White House On The Money: Economy adds 164K jobs in July | Trump signs two-year budget deal, but border showdown looms | US, EU strike deal on beef exports MORE and Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinWorld Bank approves billion-plus annual China lending plan despite US objections On The Money: Congress races to beat deadline on shutdown | Trump asks Supreme Court to shield financial records from House Democrats | House passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading Hillicon Valley: Pelosi works to remove legal protections for tech companies from USMCA | Treasury sanctions Russian group over 0 million hack | Facebook sues Chinese individuals for ad fraud | Huawei takes legal action against FCC MORE wrapped up two days of talks earlier Wednesday with their Chinese counterparts in Shanghai. 

The meetings were the first in-person negotiations between the two sides since talks broke down in May over deep disagreements regarding China’s technology policies and trading practices. President TrumpDonald John TrumpPence: It's not a "foregone conclusion" that lawmakers impeach Trump FBI identifies Pensacola shooter as Saudi Royal Saudi Air Force second lieutenant Trump calls Warren 'Pocahontas,' knocks wealth tax MORE and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed in June to freeze further tariff increases and resume the negotiations. 

While the White House expressed optimism about the talks, there was no sign of a significant breakthrough. Trump on Tuesday rattled financial markets by saying that Beijing may wait to see if he loses in the 2020 election before deciding whether to make concessions. 

“I think if China had their wish, they’d wait until after the election, they’ll pray that Trump loses, and then they’ll make a deal with a stiff,” Trump told reporters. 

Trump has long accused China of “ripping off” the U.S. on trade, and the administration has complained that the Asian economic giant forces companies to hand over sensitive technology in order to do business there. 

The president responded to the most recent breakdown in talks by raising tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese imports. China responded by slapping tariffs on more than $100 billion in U.S. goods. Trump has threatened to impose tariffs on more than $300 billion in additional Chinese goods if the government does not agree to change its trade practices.